Fight back and adapt: Industry perspectives on the management of the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in the Limfjord, Denmark

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

Abstrakt

Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, was introduced in aquaculture in Europe following a disease-driven decline of European oyster, Ostrea Edulis, in the 1960s – mistakenly assuming that lower sea-surface temperatures in the coastal waters off Northern Europe would prevent it from reproducing and becoming invasive (Troost 2010). In Scandinavia, Pacific oyster has since the 1990s increased its presence significantly (Dolmer et al. 2014). Given that sea-surface temperatures are expected to increase in the future, it is also expected that Pacific oyster will establish itself even stronger and spread further in Scandinavia. Of particular concern in the Limfjord, the strait separating the northern part of the Jutland peninsula from the rest, is the fact that Pacific oyster competes with blue mussels, Mytilus Edulis, (as well as European oyster) for food and space (Troost 2010). This article aims 1) to take stock of the situation relating to Pacific oyster in the Limfjord with particular emphasis on the effects that Pacific oyster may have on blue mussels and the associated fishery in the fjord, and 2) to outline a possible preliminary approach to the management of Pacific oyster in the Limfjord by means of stakeholder input from the mussel fishery industry. The article is concluded with a discussion of a possible multi-faceted strategy for simultaneously fighting the spread of Pacific oyster and adapting to it as a new resource.
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Detaljer

Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, was introduced in aquaculture in Europe following a disease-driven decline of European oyster, Ostrea Edulis, in the 1960s – mistakenly assuming that lower sea-surface temperatures in the coastal waters off Northern Europe would prevent it from reproducing and becoming invasive (Troost 2010). In Scandinavia, Pacific oyster has since the 1990s increased its presence significantly (Dolmer et al. 2014). Given that sea-surface temperatures are expected to increase in the future, it is also expected that Pacific oyster will establish itself even stronger and spread further in Scandinavia. Of particular concern in the Limfjord, the strait separating the northern part of the Jutland peninsula from the rest, is the fact that Pacific oyster competes with blue mussels, Mytilus Edulis, (as well as European oyster) for food and space (Troost 2010). This article aims 1) to take stock of the situation relating to Pacific oyster in the Limfjord with particular emphasis on the effects that Pacific oyster may have on blue mussels and the associated fishery in the fjord, and 2) to outline a possible preliminary approach to the management of Pacific oyster in the Limfjord by means of stakeholder input from the mussel fishery industry. The article is concluded with a discussion of a possible multi-faceted strategy for simultaneously fighting the spread of Pacific oyster and adapting to it as a new resource.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftManagement of Biological Invasions
ISSN1989-8649
StatusUnder udarbejdelse - 2018
ID: 261151031