Increased risk of depression in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus: a Danish nationwide cohort study

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  • J H Hesselvig
  • A Egeberg
  • K Kofoed
  • G Gislason
  • L Dreyer

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Reported prevalences of depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) range widely, while the prevalence of depression in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains severely understudied.

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether patients with SLE or CLE have increased risk of depression.

METHODS: In this nationwide observational cohort study, we included patients ≥ 18 years with a first-time diagnosis of SLE or CLE between 2000-2015 identified in the Danish National Patient Register matched with general population in a 1:10 ratio. After linkage to national Danish health registers of primary and secondary care, analyses of risk for depression and antidepressant use were performed in Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, prior depression, and prior antidepressant use.

RESULTS: A total of 3,489 patients with lupus erythematosus were followed for 23,373 person-years. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of depression were 2.07 (95% CI, 1.55-2.75) and 2.22 (95% CI, 1.77-2.77) for patients with CLE and SLE, respectively, compared with general population; for hospitalization due to depression at department of Psychiatry, HRs were 2.63 (95% CI, 0.80-8.67) and 3.52 (95% CI, 1.53-8.11) for patients with CLE and SLE, respectively. The adjusted HRs of antidepressant use were 1.47 (95% CI, 1.34-1.63) and 1.70 (95% CI, 1.58-1.83) for patients with CLE and SLE.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of depression was significantly increased in patients with SLE and CLE. Awareness of increased risk of depression in patients with SLE and CLE might be warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Detaljer

BACKGROUND: Reported prevalences of depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) range widely, while the prevalence of depression in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains severely understudied.

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether patients with SLE or CLE have increased risk of depression.

METHODS: In this nationwide observational cohort study, we included patients ≥ 18 years with a first-time diagnosis of SLE or CLE between 2000-2015 identified in the Danish National Patient Register matched with general population in a 1:10 ratio. After linkage to national Danish health registers of primary and secondary care, analyses of risk for depression and antidepressant use were performed in Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, prior depression, and prior antidepressant use.

RESULTS: A total of 3,489 patients with lupus erythematosus were followed for 23,373 person-years. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of depression were 2.07 (95% CI, 1.55-2.75) and 2.22 (95% CI, 1.77-2.77) for patients with CLE and SLE, respectively, compared with general population; for hospitalization due to depression at department of Psychiatry, HRs were 2.63 (95% CI, 0.80-8.67) and 3.52 (95% CI, 1.53-8.11) for patients with CLE and SLE, respectively. The adjusted HRs of antidepressant use were 1.47 (95% CI, 1.34-1.63) and 1.70 (95% CI, 1.58-1.83) for patients with CLE and SLE.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of depression was significantly increased in patients with SLE and CLE. Awareness of increased risk of depression in patients with SLE and CLE might be warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBritish Journal of Dermatology
ISSN0007-0963
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 9 jun. 2018
PublikationsartForskning
Peer reviewJa
ID: 281267726