International Migration of Couples

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

Abstrakt

We analyze emigration and return decisions of Danish couples. Our main questions are how emigration and return migration decisions depend on education, earnings, and the number and age of children. We use register data on full population from 1982 to 2006, focusing on opposite-gender couples in which the female is aged 23 to 37, and the male 25 to 39. We find that power couples in which both are highly educated are most likely to emigrate, but also most likely to return. Couples in which only the male is highly educated are more than twice as likely to emigrate as if only the female is highly edu-cated. Couples in which neither partner is highly educated are least likely to emigrate, but also have lowest return migration rates. This suggests that migration as brain circu-lation is most pronounced among the highly-educated. The probability of emigration is increasing in male earnings, but does not depend much on female earnings. Having children reduces the likelihood of emigration and the more so the older children are. Surprisingly, the return rates do not depend much on the number of children. Overall, our findings suggest that family migration patterns are still surprisingly traditional, re-sponding more to the male's job opportunities and education.
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Detaljer

We analyze emigration and return decisions of Danish couples. Our main questions are how emigration and return migration decisions depend on education, earnings, and the number and age of children. We use register data on full population from 1982 to 2006, focusing on opposite-gender couples in which the female is aged 23 to 37, and the male 25 to 39. We find that power couples in which both are highly educated are most likely to emigrate, but also most likely to return. Couples in which only the male is highly educated are more than twice as likely to emigrate as if only the female is highly edu-cated. Couples in which neither partner is highly educated are least likely to emigrate, but also have lowest return migration rates. This suggests that migration as brain circu-lation is most pronounced among the highly-educated. The probability of emigration is increasing in male earnings, but does not depend much on female earnings. Having children reduces the likelihood of emigration and the more so the older children are. Surprisingly, the return rates do not depend much on the number of children. Overall, our findings suggest that family migration patterns are still surprisingly traditional, re-sponding more to the male's job opportunities and education.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Tidsskriftxxxx
Antal sider37
StatusUnder udarbejdelse - sep. 2017
PublikationsartForskning
Peer reviewJa

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