Music Therapy, Acquired Brain Injury and Interpersonal Communication Competencies: Randomized cross-over study on music therapy in neurological rehabilitation

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportPh.d.-afhandlingForskning

Abstract

Acquired brain injury (ABI) often affects physical, cognitive and psychological aspects of a person's functioning (Bateman, et al., 2010). Psychosocial problems associated with ABI may be the major challenge facing the rehabilitation process (Morton & Wehman, 1995) Consequently, interventions that music is a useful tool to stimulate interaction since musical interaction can be engaged at almost any cognitive and physical level and still be meaningful (Baker & Tamplin, 2006; Gilbertson, 2005; Hald, 2011). In addition, music therapy researchers specialising in ABI have found that:
- Music therapy is a powerful means to improve communication, general behavior, and musical behavior (Purdie, Hamilton & Baldwin, 1997).
- Music therapy can increase emotional stability, clarify thoughts, stimulate spontaneous interaction, and increase motivation and cooperation (Nayak, Wheeler, Shiflett & Agostinelli, 2000)
- Music therapy can move a participant towards integration and conventional interaction (S.Gilbertson & Aldridge, 2008, p.141)

The theoretical framework for this study is based on Daniel Stern's (2000) concept of ways-of-being-with, the theories of communicative musicality (Malloch & Trevarthen, 2009), and the model og interpersonal communication competencies (Rubin & Martin, 1994). The theories support the notion that musical interaction and improvisation can facilitate development in basic communicative competencies.
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Detaljer

Acquired brain injury (ABI) often affects physical, cognitive and psychological aspects of a person's functioning (Bateman, et al., 2010). Psychosocial problems associated with ABI may be the major challenge facing the rehabilitation process (Morton & Wehman, 1995) Consequently, interventions that music is a useful tool to stimulate interaction since musical interaction can be engaged at almost any cognitive and physical level and still be meaningful (Baker & Tamplin, 2006; Gilbertson, 2005; Hald, 2011). In addition, music therapy researchers specialising in ABI have found that:
- Music therapy is a powerful means to improve communication, general behavior, and musical behavior (Purdie, Hamilton & Baldwin, 1997).
- Music therapy can increase emotional stability, clarify thoughts, stimulate spontaneous interaction, and increase motivation and cooperation (Nayak, Wheeler, Shiflett & Agostinelli, 2000)
- Music therapy can move a participant towards integration and conventional interaction (S.Gilbertson & Aldridge, 2008, p.141)

The theoretical framework for this study is based on Daniel Stern's (2000) concept of ways-of-being-with, the theories of communicative musicality (Malloch & Trevarthen, 2009), and the model og interpersonal communication competencies (Rubin & Martin, 1994). The theories support the notion that musical interaction and improvisation can facilitate development in basic communicative competencies.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Antal sider294
StatusUdgivet - 2012
PublikationsartForskning

Note vedr. afhandling

Forsvar den 10.11.2012
Der er følgende bedømmere til forsvaret:

The assessment committee:
Professor Cathy McKinney, (chair) Appalachian State University, USA
Lektor Esa Ala-Ruona, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Lektor Simon Gilbertson, Bergen University, Norge

Supervisor:
Professor Tony Wigram
Professor Hanne Mette Ochsner Ridder
Associate professor Felicity Baker

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