New Orleans bounce music, sexuality, and affect

Publikation: Forskning - peer reviewTidsskriftartikel

Abstrakt

This article explores how language, sexuality, and affect are circuited in New Orleans bounce music. Bounce features lyrics that characterize the performers as queer, describe sex explicitly, celebrate sex between male-bodied people, and expose the hypocrisy of straight-acting men. Bounce lyrics are just one element of bounce performances, however, which consist of the reciprocal relationship between the dancers in the audience, the intensity of the MC’s exhortations, and the rhythm of the backing musical track. Bounce performances create a fleeting community of artists, bodies and music that is less about the expression of discrete sociodemographic categories, and more about a collective affective event. Using ideas of relationality from queer and affect theory, and Stallybrass and White’s “high/low” cultural hierarchies, the article show how bounce challenges normative and academic ideas about the autonomous ‘speaking subject,’ and supports a messier understanding of the self as affectively relational.
Luk

Detaljer

This article explores how language, sexuality, and affect are circuited in New Orleans bounce music. Bounce features lyrics that characterize the performers as queer, describe sex explicitly, celebrate sex between male-bodied people, and expose the hypocrisy of straight-acting men. Bounce lyrics are just one element of bounce performances, however, which consist of the reciprocal relationship between the dancers in the audience, the intensity of the MC’s exhortations, and the rhythm of the backing musical track. Bounce performances create a fleeting community of artists, bodies and music that is less about the expression of discrete sociodemographic categories, and more about a collective affective event. Using ideas of relationality from queer and affect theory, and Stallybrass and White’s “high/low” cultural hierarchies, the article show how bounce challenges normative and academic ideas about the autonomous ‘speaking subject,’ and supports a messier understanding of the self as affectively relational.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Language and Sexuality
Antal sider33
ISSN2211-3770
StatusAfsendt - 2017
PublikationsartForskning
Peer reviewJa
ID: 260717412