Description

Fourth generation (4G) mobile communications provide very high-data rates but they consume the phone battery very fast, with the power amplifier being responsible for more than 50% of such power consumption. The advanced power amplifier techniques developed in this project will be the key to develop new mobile phones providing at the same time high data-rates and long battery-life.

The wideband signals deployed at the physical layer of 4G systems are characterized by a high PAPR (Peak-to-Average Power Ratio), which is one of the major causes for the dramatically decreased power efficiency in 4G transmitters. Power efficiency is the most desired quality in advanced 4G mobile transmitters because it can prolong the duration of the phone battery.

In order to overcome this established status quo, both industry and academia have been industriously engaged in the past 15 years researching and developing highly efficient transmitter topologies. One of the most researched topologies, the Envelope Tracking (ET) transmitter, can typically improve the power amplifier efficiency up to 25 %-points, but it dramatically increases the system complexity.

Moreover, in the ET transmitter the introduced time-varying supply regime causes a number of specific distortion phenomena that are difficult to model and compensate deploying the state-of-the-art PA models.

The advanced PA characterization and modeling tools developed in this project will enable an accurate representation and cancellation of ET dynamic distortions, with a consequent considerable speed-up in the design flow of ET transmitter.

The project activities will comprehend the development of an innovative measurement platform capable of simultaneous capabilities for wideband acquisition, wide dynamic range and accurate calibration; the invention and validation of a multi-variate dynamic model for ET PAs and the proof of the developed characterization and modeling tools through an ET reference design.
AcronymETCaM
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date15/09/201415/09/2017

    Research areas

  • Power amplifiers, Behavioral modeling, Nonlinear devices charcterization, Envelope tracking
ID: 214689405