Analysis of pressure safety valves for fire protection on offshore oil and gas installations

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article

Abstract

The effectiveness of fire Pressure Safety Valves (PSV) has been investigated when offshore process equipment is exposed to a fire. Simulations of several typical offshore pressure vessels have been performed using the commercial software VessFire. The pressure vessels are exposed to a small jet fire, large jet fire, and a pool fire on both the wetted and unwetted part of the vessels. Rupture times of the vessels are calculated by comparing the pressure in the vessel with the tensile strength of the material. Rupture times are then compared for the vessels, with and without a PSV, in order to see the effect of the installed PSV. It is found that when a fire affects the unwetted part of a vessel, the PSV offers only minor or no additional protection. When a fire affects the wetted part of a vessel, the PSV relieve the inventory as designed. It is argued that PSVs provide insufficient fire protection for typical offshore fire scenarios and that blowdown valves and passive fire protection should be considered as alternatives.
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The effectiveness of fire Pressure Safety Valves (PSV) has been investigated when offshore process equipment is exposed to a fire. Simulations of several typical offshore pressure vessels have been performed using the commercial software VessFire. The pressure vessels are exposed to a small jet fire, large jet fire, and a pool fire on both the wetted and unwetted part of the vessels. Rupture times of the vessels are calculated by comparing the pressure in the vessel with the tensile strength of the material. Rupture times are then compared for the vessels, with and without a PSV, in order to see the effect of the installed PSV. It is found that when a fire affects the unwetted part of a vessel, the PSV offers only minor or no additional protection. When a fire affects the wetted part of a vessel, the PSV relieve the inventory as designed. It is argued that PSVs provide insufficient fire protection for typical offshore fire scenarios and that blowdown valves and passive fire protection should be considered as alternatives.
Original languageEnglish
JournalProcess Safety and Environmental Protection
Volume105
Pages (from-to)60–68
Number of pages9
ISSN0957-5820
DOI
StatePublished - Jan 2017
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

    Research areas

  • PSV, Fire protection, Pressure vessel, Oil and gas, Offshore installations
ID: 242721859