Network Slicing in Industry 4.0 Applications: Abstraction Methods and End-to-End Analysis

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Abstract

Industry 4.0 refers to the fourth industrial revolution, and
introduces modern communication and computation technologies such as
5G, cloud computing and Internet of Things to industrial manufacturing
systems. As a result, many devices, machines and applications will
rely on connectivity, while having different requirements from the
network, ranging from high reliability and low latency to high data
rates. Furthermore, these industrial networks will be highly
heterogeneous as they will feature a number of diverse communication
technologies. In this article, we propose network slicing as a mechanism
to handle the diverse set of requirements to the network. We present
methods for slicing deterministic and packet-switched industrial
communication protocols at an abstraction level which is decoupled
from the specific implementation of the underlying technologies, and
hence simplifies the slicing of heterogeneous networks. Finally, we
show how network calculus can be used to assess the end-to-end properties
of the network slices.
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Details

Industry 4.0 refers to the fourth industrial revolution, and
introduces modern communication and computation technologies such as
5G, cloud computing and Internet of Things to industrial manufacturing
systems. As a result, many devices, machines and applications will
rely on connectivity, while having different requirements from the
network, ranging from high reliability and low latency to high data
rates. Furthermore, these industrial networks will be highly
heterogeneous as they will feature a number of diverse communication
technologies. In this article, we propose network slicing as a mechanism
to handle the diverse set of requirements to the network. We present
methods for slicing deterministic and packet-switched industrial
communication protocols at an abstraction level which is decoupled
from the specific implementation of the underlying technologies, and
hence simplifies the slicing of heterogeneous networks. Finally, we
show how network calculus can be used to assess the end-to-end properties
of the network slices.
Original languageEnglish
JournalI E E E Network
ISSN0890-8044
DOI
StateSubmitted - 2018
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes
ID: 261836049