A preliminary evaluation of the interpersonal music-communication competence scales

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Resumé

With the aim to develop and test a reliable and valid measure of communicative competencies in music for use in acquired brain injury rehabilitation settings, the interpersonal music-communication competence scale (IMCCS) was constructed, adapted from the interpersonal communication competence scale. Fifteen participants with medium to severe acquired brain injury, one music therapist and two blinded raters were involved in testing the IMCCS-Participant, the IMCCS-Therapist and the IMCCS-Rater versions of the scale. Before and after 20 music therapy sessions, each participant performed four music-based improvisational exercises in 1:1 sessions with the therapist (dialogue with the therapist, follow the musical ideas of the therapist, maintain musical phrases while therapist intentionally interrupt/challenge, and free improvisation with the therapist). Immediately following these improvisations, the participants and therapist completed the IMCCS. Two blinded raters completed the IMCCS-Rater after viewing video recordings of the exercises. Results revealed that the IMCCS-Therapist has good internal consistency (α = .89), the IMCCS-Participant has excellent internal consistency (α = .93), and the IMCCS-Rater has excellent internal consistency (α = .90). The two raters’ scores correlated significantly (r(26) = .54 to .73, p < .004), and a Cohen’s kappa analysis indicated a good agreement (Kw = .60). In addition, the correlation between the IMCCS-Rater and IMCCS-Therapist scores was adequate (r = .64, p = .005). All scales have satisfactory internal consistency and inter-rater reliability. These findings suggest that the IMCCS is a reliable measure of interpersonal communication competencies in music for people with acquired brain injury.
Bidragets oversatte titelA preliminary evaluation of the interpersonal music-communication competence scales
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNordic Journal of Music Therapy
Vol/bind26
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)40-61
Antal sider22
ISSN0809-8131
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2017

Fingerprint

Music
Mental Competency
music
Communication
therapist
communication
evaluation
Brain Injuries
spontaneity
brain
interpersonal communication
Communication Competence
Evaluation
music therapy
Music Therapy
Video Recording
video recording
Raters
rehabilitation

Emneord

  • music therapy
  • acquired brain injury
  • assessment
  • outcome measure
  • interpersonal communication
  • improvisation

Citer dette

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abstract = "With the aim to develop and test a reliable and valid measure of communicative competencies in music for use in acquired brain injury rehabilitation settings, the interpersonal music-communication competence scale (IMCCS) was constructed, adapted from the interpersonal communication competence scale. Fifteen participants with medium to severe acquired brain injury, one music therapist and two blinded raters were involved in testing the IMCCS-Participant, the IMCCS-Therapist and the IMCCS-Rater versions of the scale. Before and after 20 music therapy sessions, each participant performed four music-based improvisational exercises in 1:1 sessions with the therapist (dialogue with the therapist, follow the musical ideas of the therapist, maintain musical phrases while therapist intentionally interrupt/challenge, and free improvisation with the therapist). Immediately following these improvisations, the participants and therapist completed the IMCCS. Two blinded raters completed the IMCCS-Rater after viewing video recordings of the exercises. Results revealed that the IMCCS-Therapist has good internal consistency (α = .89), the IMCCS-Participant has excellent internal consistency (α = .93), and the IMCCS-Rater has excellent internal consistency (α = .90). The two raters’ scores correlated significantly (r(26) = .54 to .73, p < .004), and a Cohen’s kappa analysis indicated a good agreement (Kw = .60). In addition, the correlation between the IMCCS-Rater and IMCCS-Therapist scores was adequate (r = .64, p = .005). All scales have satisfactory internal consistency and inter-rater reliability. These findings suggest that the IMCCS is a reliable measure of interpersonal communication competencies in music for people with acquired brain injury. Luk",
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A preliminary evaluation of the interpersonal music-communication competence scales. / Hald, Søren Vester; Baker, Felicity Ann; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner.

I: Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, Bind 26, Nr. 1, 01.2017, s. 40-61.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A preliminary evaluation of the interpersonal music-communication competence scales

AU - Hald, Søren Vester

AU - Baker, Felicity Ann

AU - Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

PY - 2017/1

Y1 - 2017/1

N2 - With the aim to develop and test a reliable and valid measure of communicative competencies in music for use in acquired brain injury rehabilitation settings, the interpersonal music-communication competence scale (IMCCS) was constructed, adapted from the interpersonal communication competence scale. Fifteen participants with medium to severe acquired brain injury, one music therapist and two blinded raters were involved in testing the IMCCS-Participant, the IMCCS-Therapist and the IMCCS-Rater versions of the scale. Before and after 20 music therapy sessions, each participant performed four music-based improvisational exercises in 1:1 sessions with the therapist (dialogue with the therapist, follow the musical ideas of the therapist, maintain musical phrases while therapist intentionally interrupt/challenge, and free improvisation with the therapist). Immediately following these improvisations, the participants and therapist completed the IMCCS. Two blinded raters completed the IMCCS-Rater after viewing video recordings of the exercises. Results revealed that the IMCCS-Therapist has good internal consistency (α = .89), the IMCCS-Participant has excellent internal consistency (α = .93), and the IMCCS-Rater has excellent internal consistency (α = .90). The two raters’ scores correlated significantly (r(26) = .54 to .73, p < .004), and a Cohen’s kappa analysis indicated a good agreement (Kw = .60). In addition, the correlation between the IMCCS-Rater and IMCCS-Therapist scores was adequate (r = .64, p = .005). All scales have satisfactory internal consistency and inter-rater reliability. These findings suggest that the IMCCS is a reliable measure of interpersonal communication competencies in music for people with acquired brain injury. Luk

AB - With the aim to develop and test a reliable and valid measure of communicative competencies in music for use in acquired brain injury rehabilitation settings, the interpersonal music-communication competence scale (IMCCS) was constructed, adapted from the interpersonal communication competence scale. Fifteen participants with medium to severe acquired brain injury, one music therapist and two blinded raters were involved in testing the IMCCS-Participant, the IMCCS-Therapist and the IMCCS-Rater versions of the scale. Before and after 20 music therapy sessions, each participant performed four music-based improvisational exercises in 1:1 sessions with the therapist (dialogue with the therapist, follow the musical ideas of the therapist, maintain musical phrases while therapist intentionally interrupt/challenge, and free improvisation with the therapist). Immediately following these improvisations, the participants and therapist completed the IMCCS. Two blinded raters completed the IMCCS-Rater after viewing video recordings of the exercises. Results revealed that the IMCCS-Therapist has good internal consistency (α = .89), the IMCCS-Participant has excellent internal consistency (α = .93), and the IMCCS-Rater has excellent internal consistency (α = .90). The two raters’ scores correlated significantly (r(26) = .54 to .73, p < .004), and a Cohen’s kappa analysis indicated a good agreement (Kw = .60). In addition, the correlation between the IMCCS-Rater and IMCCS-Therapist scores was adequate (r = .64, p = .005). All scales have satisfactory internal consistency and inter-rater reliability. These findings suggest that the IMCCS is a reliable measure of interpersonal communication competencies in music for people with acquired brain injury. Luk

KW - music therapy

KW - acquired brain injury

KW - assessment

KW - outcome measure

KW - interpersonal communication

KW - improvisation

U2 - 10.1080/08098131.2015.1117122

DO - 10.1080/08098131.2015.1117122

M3 - Journal article

VL - 26

SP - 40

EP - 61

JO - Nordic Journal of Music Therapy

JF - Nordic Journal of Music Therapy

SN - 0809-8131

IS - 1

ER -