Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

Periodization is an important tool for all historians, but used unwisely it fosters misconceptions and is at best unhelpful . This essay – bringing together thoughts and ideas from my thinking about Actium – will evaluate different potential ways of approaching Actium : as a battle engaged on 2 September 31 BCE ; a campaign victory ; a catalyst for the transition from Republic to Principate (signifying continuity) ; a main « Augustan » turning-point (a singular event) , or, bringing it all together, as an idea (never static, of victory and peace) and as the foundation myth of the Augustan Principate. Let us start by stating the obvious : Actium was the main turning-point in the war against Cleopatra and Antonius, certainly so from a military point of view. It was also what made monarchy possible, inasmuch as it signified the main defeat of Young Caesar’s enemies. This is where the war was decided . It was declared as a « foreign » war in 32 BCE, against Egypt and Cleopatra – Cassius Dio nicely underscores the official narrative of the Augustan regime when he states that the war was declared against Cleopatra, but was in reality against Antonius – but later it was (also) turned into a civil war by Antonius, helping Cleopatra. Antonius was deprived of all of his powers and of the consulship, which he was due to hold in 31 BCE and was now a privatus ; if he were to take up arms against Young Caesar and the res publica, he would declare war on the state and thus declare himself a hostis, and consequently no official hostis declaration was needed. Finally the wars – civil and foreign – were ended by Young Caesar at Actium 31 BCE, with a postscript at Alexandria 30 BCE . ... ...
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelPhilippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin
ForlagÉcole française de Rome
StatusAfsendt - 2019

Fingerprint

Turning Point
Cleopatra
Augustan
Civil War
Victory
National Archives
Principate
Misconceptions
Periodization
Cassius Dio
Signifying
Military
Egypt
Declaration
Historian
Foundation Myth
Enemy
Defeat
Monarchy
Peace

Citer dette

Lange, C. H. (2019). Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point. Manuskript afsendt til publicering. I Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin École française de Rome.
Lange, Carsten Hjort. / Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point. Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin. École française de Rome, 2019.
@inbook{c74ac8985667409b87a49e98a4f51e13,
title = "Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point",
abstract = "Periodization is an important tool for all historians, but used unwisely it fosters misconceptions and is at best unhelpful . This essay – bringing together thoughts and ideas from my thinking about Actium – will evaluate different potential ways of approaching Actium : as a battle engaged on 2 September 31 BCE ; a campaign victory ; a catalyst for the transition from Republic to Principate (signifying continuity) ; a main « Augustan » turning-point (a singular event) , or, bringing it all together, as an idea (never static, of victory and peace) and as the foundation myth of the Augustan Principate. Let us start by stating the obvious : Actium was the main turning-point in the war against Cleopatra and Antonius, certainly so from a military point of view. It was also what made monarchy possible, inasmuch as it signified the main defeat of Young Caesar’s enemies. This is where the war was decided . It was declared as a « foreign » war in 32 BCE, against Egypt and Cleopatra – Cassius Dio nicely underscores the official narrative of the Augustan regime when he states that the war was declared against Cleopatra, but was in reality against Antonius – but later it was (also) turned into a civil war by Antonius, helping Cleopatra. Antonius was deprived of all of his powers and of the consulship, which he was due to hold in 31 BCE and was now a privatus ; if he were to take up arms against Young Caesar and the res publica, he would declare war on the state and thus declare himself a hostis, and consequently no official hostis declaration was needed. Finally the wars – civil and foreign – were ended by Young Caesar at Actium 31 BCE, with a postscript at Alexandria 30 BCE . ... ...",
author = "Lange, {Carsten Hjort}",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste {\`a} Constantin",
publisher = "{\'E}cole fran{\cc}aise de Rome",

}

Lange, CH 2019, Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point. i Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin. École française de Rome.

Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point. / Lange, Carsten Hjort.

Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin. École française de Rome, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point

AU - Lange, Carsten Hjort

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Periodization is an important tool for all historians, but used unwisely it fosters misconceptions and is at best unhelpful . This essay – bringing together thoughts and ideas from my thinking about Actium – will evaluate different potential ways of approaching Actium : as a battle engaged on 2 September 31 BCE ; a campaign victory ; a catalyst for the transition from Republic to Principate (signifying continuity) ; a main « Augustan » turning-point (a singular event) , or, bringing it all together, as an idea (never static, of victory and peace) and as the foundation myth of the Augustan Principate. Let us start by stating the obvious : Actium was the main turning-point in the war against Cleopatra and Antonius, certainly so from a military point of view. It was also what made monarchy possible, inasmuch as it signified the main defeat of Young Caesar’s enemies. This is where the war was decided . It was declared as a « foreign » war in 32 BCE, against Egypt and Cleopatra – Cassius Dio nicely underscores the official narrative of the Augustan regime when he states that the war was declared against Cleopatra, but was in reality against Antonius – but later it was (also) turned into a civil war by Antonius, helping Cleopatra. Antonius was deprived of all of his powers and of the consulship, which he was due to hold in 31 BCE and was now a privatus ; if he were to take up arms against Young Caesar and the res publica, he would declare war on the state and thus declare himself a hostis, and consequently no official hostis declaration was needed. Finally the wars – civil and foreign – were ended by Young Caesar at Actium 31 BCE, with a postscript at Alexandria 30 BCE . ... ...

AB - Periodization is an important tool for all historians, but used unwisely it fosters misconceptions and is at best unhelpful . This essay – bringing together thoughts and ideas from my thinking about Actium – will evaluate different potential ways of approaching Actium : as a battle engaged on 2 September 31 BCE ; a campaign victory ; a catalyst for the transition from Republic to Principate (signifying continuity) ; a main « Augustan » turning-point (a singular event) , or, bringing it all together, as an idea (never static, of victory and peace) and as the foundation myth of the Augustan Principate. Let us start by stating the obvious : Actium was the main turning-point in the war against Cleopatra and Antonius, certainly so from a military point of view. It was also what made monarchy possible, inasmuch as it signified the main defeat of Young Caesar’s enemies. This is where the war was decided . It was declared as a « foreign » war in 32 BCE, against Egypt and Cleopatra – Cassius Dio nicely underscores the official narrative of the Augustan regime when he states that the war was declared against Cleopatra, but was in reality against Antonius – but later it was (also) turned into a civil war by Antonius, helping Cleopatra. Antonius was deprived of all of his powers and of the consulship, which he was due to hold in 31 BCE and was now a privatus ; if he were to take up arms against Young Caesar and the res publica, he would declare war on the state and thus declare himself a hostis, and consequently no official hostis declaration was needed. Finally the wars – civil and foreign – were ended by Young Caesar at Actium 31 BCE, with a postscript at Alexandria 30 BCE . ... ...

M3 - Book chapter

BT - Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin

PB - École française de Rome

ER -

Lange CH. Actium: Battle, Campaign, Turning Point. I Philippe Le Doze (ed.) Le costume de Prince. Regards sur une figure politique de la Rome antique d’Auguste à Constantin. École française de Rome. 2019