An Empiricism with High Metaphysical Ambitions: On Short’s Charles Peirce and Modern Science

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Abstract

T.L. Short’s Charles Peirce and Modern Science, in which he discusses Peirce’s intimate relation to modern science, simultaneously functions as Short’s own philosophical testament. Short’s overall argument is that Peirce takes inquiry to be the main definition of science, implying that all other definition attempts or central issues of science are but products of inquiry: methods, experiments, observations, conclusions, results, syntheses, theory buildings, system constructions, laws, predictions, metaphysical assumptions, scientific values, etc. On this basis, Short develops central Peircean ideas such as inquiry into inquiry, phenomenology, and his “normative sciences” as elements of a reinvigorated and metaphysically ambitious version of empiricism. In this process, however, certain problems appear, such as Short’s tendency to refute any relevance in scientific investigations of systematicity, the a priori, the strive for conclusions and results.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society
Vol/bind59
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)388-403
Antal sider16
ISSN0009-1774
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2023

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