Architectural Mealscapes

A paradigm for Interior Design for Food

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

Resumé

Since the beginning of humanity, food and design have been inseparable. When the first primitive tribes with an interest in cooking established a food-preparing fire they created the first meals, established the first eating environments and built the first primitive shelters. Back in 1852 the German architect Gottfried Semper developed a theory on the “four elements of Architecture” tracing the origin of architecture back to the rise of the early human settlement and the creation of fire. With the notion ‘hearth’ as the first motive in architecture and the definition of three enclosing motives; mounding, enclosure and roof, Semper linked the cultural and social values of the primordial fireplace with the order and shape of architecture. He claimed that any building ever made was nothing but a variation of the first primitive shelters erected around the fireplace, and that the three enclosing motives existed only as defenders of the “sacred flame”. In that way Semper developed the idea that any architectural scenery can be described, analyzed and explained by understanding the contextual, symbolic and social values of how the four basic motives of hearth, mounding, enclosure, and roof are jointed together.
The purpose of this paper has therefore been to test the idea of a new paradigm for ‘Interior Design for Food’ taking into account the reflective perspective and critical thinking of architectural theory like for instance developed with Semper, when studying the eating environment
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelInternational Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food : Conference proceedings
RedaktørerFrancesca Zampollo, Chris Smith
Antal sider12
ForlagLondon Metropolitan University
Publikationsdato2012
Sider117-128
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-1-907675-18-8
StatusUdgivet - 2012
BegivenhedInternational Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food - London Metropolitan University, London, Storbritannien
Varighed: 28 jun. 201229 jun. 2012
http://www.fooddesign2012.com

Konference

KonferenceInternational Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food
LokationLondon Metropolitan University
LandStorbritannien
ByLondon
Periode28/06/201229/06/2012
Internetadresse

Fingerprint

Paradigm
Food
Enclosure
Social Values
Shelter
Fireplace
Hearth
Architectural Theory
Cooking
Critical Thinking
Scenery
Defenders
Contextual
Rise
Tribes
Meal
Reflective
New Paradigm
Cultural Values

Emneord

  • Interior Design
  • Architectural Mealscape
  • Food
  • Architectural Theory

Citer dette

Tvedebrink, T. D. O., Fisker, A. M., & Kirkegaard, P. H. (2012). Architectural Mealscapes: A paradigm for Interior Design for Food. I F. Zampollo, & C. Smith (red.), International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food: Conference proceedings (s. 117-128). London Metropolitan University.
Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen ; Fisker, Anna Marie ; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning. / Architectural Mealscapes : A paradigm for Interior Design for Food. International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food: Conference proceedings. red. / Francesca Zampollo ; Chris Smith. London Metropolitan University, 2012. s. 117-128
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abstract = "Since the beginning of humanity, food and design have been inseparable. When the first primitive tribes with an interest in cooking established a food-preparing fire they created the first meals, established the first eating environments and built the first primitive shelters. Back in 1852 the German architect Gottfried Semper developed a theory on the “four elements of Architecture” tracing the origin of architecture back to the rise of the early human settlement and the creation of fire. With the notion ‘hearth’ as the first motive in architecture and the definition of three enclosing motives; mounding, enclosure and roof, Semper linked the cultural and social values of the primordial fireplace with the order and shape of architecture. He claimed that any building ever made was nothing but a variation of the first primitive shelters erected around the fireplace, and that the three enclosing motives existed only as defenders of the “sacred flame”. In that way Semper developed the idea that any architectural scenery can be described, analyzed and explained by understanding the contextual, symbolic and social values of how the four basic motives of hearth, mounding, enclosure, and roof are jointed together.The purpose of this paper has therefore been to test the idea of a new paradigm for ‘Interior Design for Food’ taking into account the reflective perspective and critical thinking of architectural theory like for instance developed with Semper, when studying the eating environment",
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Tvedebrink, TDO, Fisker, AM & Kirkegaard, PH 2012, Architectural Mealscapes: A paradigm for Interior Design for Food. i F Zampollo & C Smith (red), International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food: Conference proceedings. London Metropolitan University, s. 117-128, International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food, London, Storbritannien, 28/06/2012.

Architectural Mealscapes : A paradigm for Interior Design for Food. / Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning.

International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food: Conference proceedings. red. / Francesca Zampollo; Chris Smith. London Metropolitan University, 2012. s. 117-128.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

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Tvedebrink TDO, Fisker AM, Kirkegaard PH. Architectural Mealscapes: A paradigm for Interior Design for Food. I Zampollo F, Smith C, red., International Conference on Designing Food and Designing for Food: Conference proceedings. London Metropolitan University. 2012. s. 117-128