Beyond 'Behaviour': the Institutionalisation of Practice and the Case of Energy efficient Lighting in Denmark

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In contrast with approaches which focus on behaviour relating to purchasing decisions and attitudes of consumers, research on social practices emphasises the analysis of what people routinely do and the elements of practice underpinning institutionalisation of collective conventions. The paper contributes to this growing stream of literature by investigating social practices relevant to energy-efficient lighting in Denmark. The paper reports on data collected from ‘ethnographic interviews’ conducted in 16 Danish households. The paper suggests that drawing on insights from institutional theory could enrich our understanding of social practices, for example in relation to the emergence and embedding of new practices and shedding of ‘old’ ones. As well as highlighting the elements of practice previously identified as integral to collective conventions and connections among different domains of practice, the paper recognises the importance of phenomena usually examined in work emphasising institutional analysis. It suggests that policy interventions need to recognise various kinds of institutional rules and processes which confer legitimacy to emerging practices, to facilitate their sedimentation, and contribute to realising environmentally sustainable systems and societies.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Consumer Culture
Vol/bind19
Udgave nummer3
ISSN1469-5405
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

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Illegitimacy
Institutionalization
Denmark
Lighting
institutionalization
work environment
Interviews
energy
Research
consumer research
Energy
Social practice
Social Practice
legitimacy

Citer dette

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Beyond 'Behaviour': the Institutionalisation of Practice and the Case of Energy efficient Lighting in Denmark. / Genus, Audley; Jensen, Charlotte Louise.

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Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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