Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making

Laurits Rohden Skov, Rasmus Friis Rasmussen, Pernille Møller Andersen, Annemarie Olsen, Armando Perez-Cueto

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

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Resumé

Objective: To test the effectiveness of three types of choice architectural nudges to promote vegetable consumption among Danish people. The experiment aims at providing evidence on the influence of automatic processing system in the food choice situation in an all you can eat buffet serving. Methodology: Experimental cross-over design study in the FoodScape Lab, comparing control to exposure of three nudges: Nudge 1: Natural green - priming vegetable-choosing behaviour. Nudge 2: Having a pre-weighed (200g) fixed salad as default to the main course, and Nudge 3: presenting each component of the salad separately to increase choices compared to a pre-mixed salad. Results: A total of 92 people (dropout rate=21 %) partook in the study (60.2% female) with an average age of 26.5. Nudge 1 (N=27) found a significant decrease in total energy consumption due to high decrease in meat consumption (p<0.001) but no significant change in vegetable in- take (p=0.16). Nudge 2 (N=33) found a significant increase in vegetable consumption (p=0.018) while Nudge 3 (N=32) found no impact on vegetable intake (p=0.56) but a decrease in total energy intake due to a decrease in meat intake (p<0.001 ). Key Findings: Only the Nudge that had a default portion size of vegetable had he intended impact of increasing vegetable consumption. This emphasises the importance of portion sizes in out of home eating as well as underlines the effect of the one-unit bias. The remaining two nudges were not successful in increasing vegetable intake, but promoted health by decreasing total energy intake which suggests that visual variety of fruit and greens prompts a healthy-eater subconscious behaviour.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Community Nutrition
Vol/bind0
Udgave nummerSupplement
Sider (fra-til)38
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2014
BegivenhedWorld Congress of Public Health Nutrition - Las Palmas, Spanien
Varighed: 9 nov. 201413 nov. 2014
Konferencens nummer: 3

Konference

KonferenceWorld Congress of Public Health Nutrition
Nummer3
LandSpanien
ByLas Palmas
Periode09/11/201413/11/2014

Citer dette

Skov, L. R., Friis Rasmussen, R., Møller Andersen, P., Olsen, A., & Perez-Cueto, A. (2014). Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making. International Journal of Community Nutrition, 0(Supplement), 38.
Skov, Laurits Rohden ; Friis Rasmussen, Rasmus ; Møller Andersen, Pernille ; Olsen, Annemarie ; Perez-Cueto, Armando. / Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making. I: International Journal of Community Nutrition. 2014 ; Bind 0, Nr. Supplement. s. 38.
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title = "Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making",
abstract = "Objective: To test the effectiveness of three types of choice architectural nudges to promote vegetable consumption among Danish people. The experiment aims at providing evidence on the influence of automatic processing system in the food choice situation in an all you can eat buffet serving. Methodology: Experimental cross-over design study in the FoodScape Lab, comparing control to exposure of three nudges: Nudge 1: Natural green - priming vegetable-choosing behaviour. Nudge 2: Having a pre-weighed (200g) fixed salad as default to the main course, and Nudge 3: presenting each component of the salad separately to increase choices compared to a pre-mixed salad. Results: A total of 92 people (dropout rate=21 {\%}) partook in the study (60.2{\%} female) with an average age of 26.5. Nudge 1 (N=27) found a significant decrease in total energy consumption due to high decrease in meat consumption (p<0.001) but no significant change in vegetable in- take (p=0.16). Nudge 2 (N=33) found a significant increase in vegetable consumption (p=0.018) while Nudge 3 (N=32) found no impact on vegetable intake (p=0.56) but a decrease in total energy intake due to a decrease in meat intake (p<0.001 ). Key Findings: Only the Nudge that had a default portion size of vegetable had he intended impact of increasing vegetable consumption. This emphasises the importance of portion sizes in out of home eating as well as underlines the effect of the one-unit bias. The remaining two nudges were not successful in increasing vegetable intake, but promoted health by decreasing total energy intake which suggests that visual variety of fruit and greens prompts a healthy-eater subconscious behaviour.",
author = "Skov, {Laurits Rohden} and {Friis Rasmussen}, Rasmus and {M{\o}ller Andersen}, Pernille and Annemarie Olsen and Armando Perez-Cueto",
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Skov, LR, Friis Rasmussen, R, Møller Andersen, P, Olsen, A & Perez-Cueto, A 2014, 'Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making', International Journal of Community Nutrition, bind 0, nr. Supplement, s. 38.

Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making. / Skov, Laurits Rohden; Friis Rasmussen, Rasmus; Møller Andersen, Pernille; Olsen, Annemarie; Perez-Cueto, Armando.

I: International Journal of Community Nutrition, Bind 0, Nr. Supplement, 11.2014, s. 38.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Choice architectural nudge interventions to promote vegetable consumption based on automatic processes decision-making

AU - Skov, Laurits Rohden

AU - Friis Rasmussen, Rasmus

AU - Møller Andersen, Pernille

AU - Olsen, Annemarie

AU - Perez-Cueto, Armando

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Objective: To test the effectiveness of three types of choice architectural nudges to promote vegetable consumption among Danish people. The experiment aims at providing evidence on the influence of automatic processing system in the food choice situation in an all you can eat buffet serving. Methodology: Experimental cross-over design study in the FoodScape Lab, comparing control to exposure of three nudges: Nudge 1: Natural green - priming vegetable-choosing behaviour. Nudge 2: Having a pre-weighed (200g) fixed salad as default to the main course, and Nudge 3: presenting each component of the salad separately to increase choices compared to a pre-mixed salad. Results: A total of 92 people (dropout rate=21 %) partook in the study (60.2% female) with an average age of 26.5. Nudge 1 (N=27) found a significant decrease in total energy consumption due to high decrease in meat consumption (p<0.001) but no significant change in vegetable in- take (p=0.16). Nudge 2 (N=33) found a significant increase in vegetable consumption (p=0.018) while Nudge 3 (N=32) found no impact on vegetable intake (p=0.56) but a decrease in total energy intake due to a decrease in meat intake (p<0.001 ). Key Findings: Only the Nudge that had a default portion size of vegetable had he intended impact of increasing vegetable consumption. This emphasises the importance of portion sizes in out of home eating as well as underlines the effect of the one-unit bias. The remaining two nudges were not successful in increasing vegetable intake, but promoted health by decreasing total energy intake which suggests that visual variety of fruit and greens prompts a healthy-eater subconscious behaviour.

AB - Objective: To test the effectiveness of three types of choice architectural nudges to promote vegetable consumption among Danish people. The experiment aims at providing evidence on the influence of automatic processing system in the food choice situation in an all you can eat buffet serving. Methodology: Experimental cross-over design study in the FoodScape Lab, comparing control to exposure of three nudges: Nudge 1: Natural green - priming vegetable-choosing behaviour. Nudge 2: Having a pre-weighed (200g) fixed salad as default to the main course, and Nudge 3: presenting each component of the salad separately to increase choices compared to a pre-mixed salad. Results: A total of 92 people (dropout rate=21 %) partook in the study (60.2% female) with an average age of 26.5. Nudge 1 (N=27) found a significant decrease in total energy consumption due to high decrease in meat consumption (p<0.001) but no significant change in vegetable in- take (p=0.16). Nudge 2 (N=33) found a significant increase in vegetable consumption (p=0.018) while Nudge 3 (N=32) found no impact on vegetable intake (p=0.56) but a decrease in total energy intake due to a decrease in meat intake (p<0.001 ). Key Findings: Only the Nudge that had a default portion size of vegetable had he intended impact of increasing vegetable consumption. This emphasises the importance of portion sizes in out of home eating as well as underlines the effect of the one-unit bias. The remaining two nudges were not successful in increasing vegetable intake, but promoted health by decreasing total energy intake which suggests that visual variety of fruit and greens prompts a healthy-eater subconscious behaviour.

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 0

SP - 38

JO - International Journal of Community Nutrition

JF - International Journal of Community Nutrition

SN - 2386-673X

IS - Supplement

ER -