Coming to Denmark: Coming to Europe: American exceptionalism and American migrants’ adaption to comprehensive welfare states.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

2 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Cross-national differences in public opinions about welfare policies, and the role of the government more generally, are often explained in terms of institutional differences. It is widely believed that the hostility towards welfare policies in the US and their support in the Nordic countries is partly caused by the institutional structure of what Esping-Andersen (1990) famously labeled liberal and social democratic welfare regimes. The paper contributes to this literature by analyzing welfare attitudes among American migrants living in a social democratic welfare regime. The paper combines a survey among first generation American migrants living in Denmark with already existing survey data on American and Danish welfare attitudes. As expected, the article finds that Americans living in a context of social democratic welfare institutions are 1) more supportive of the welfare state than are Americans living in (neo)liberal welfare institutions and 2) are as, or more, supportive than are native Danes. The article finds more evidence of the context-effect being caused by exposure to Danish welfare state institutions than to Danish culture in general.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Sociology
Vol/bind49
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)130
Antal sider147
ISSN0020-7659
StatusUdgivet - maj 2019

Fingerprint

Denmark
welfare state
migrant
responsibility
interpretation
individuality
first generation
redistribution
nation state
social policy
Netherlands
Group

Citer dette

@article{b37c9d175ac14ac2934b3107ed9c0f19,
title = "Coming to Denmark: Coming to Europe: American exceptionalism and American migrants’ adaption to comprehensive welfare states.",
abstract = "The US has not developed a comprehensive welfare state, unlike most other Western countries, and this has been subject to a number of different interpretations. One of the prominent theories is that Americans carry a special creed of individuality and liberty that can be traced back to the establishment of the American nation state. This cultural “American exceptionalism” is argued to be a hindrance to welfare state development in the past as well as in the future. The article challenges this cultural essentialist interpretation by comparing the attitudes towards government responsibility for welfare policies among first generation American migrants living in Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark to Americans living in the US. The article finds, using propensity score matching, that the Americans exposed to the institutional context of North European welfares states are more supportive of governmental responsibility for sick, pensioners, unemployed and redistribution than are the American control group.",
author = "Hedegaard, {Troels Fage} and Larsen, {Christian Albrekt}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "130",
journal = "International Journal of Sociology",
issn = "0020-7659",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coming to Denmark

T2 - Coming to Europe: American exceptionalism and American migrants’ adaption to comprehensive welfare states.

AU - Hedegaard, Troels Fage

AU - Larsen, Christian Albrekt

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - The US has not developed a comprehensive welfare state, unlike most other Western countries, and this has been subject to a number of different interpretations. One of the prominent theories is that Americans carry a special creed of individuality and liberty that can be traced back to the establishment of the American nation state. This cultural “American exceptionalism” is argued to be a hindrance to welfare state development in the past as well as in the future. The article challenges this cultural essentialist interpretation by comparing the attitudes towards government responsibility for welfare policies among first generation American migrants living in Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark to Americans living in the US. The article finds, using propensity score matching, that the Americans exposed to the institutional context of North European welfares states are more supportive of governmental responsibility for sick, pensioners, unemployed and redistribution than are the American control group.

AB - The US has not developed a comprehensive welfare state, unlike most other Western countries, and this has been subject to a number of different interpretations. One of the prominent theories is that Americans carry a special creed of individuality and liberty that can be traced back to the establishment of the American nation state. This cultural “American exceptionalism” is argued to be a hindrance to welfare state development in the past as well as in the future. The article challenges this cultural essentialist interpretation by comparing the attitudes towards government responsibility for welfare policies among first generation American migrants living in Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark to Americans living in the US. The article finds, using propensity score matching, that the Americans exposed to the institutional context of North European welfares states are more supportive of governmental responsibility for sick, pensioners, unemployed and redistribution than are the American control group.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 49

SP - 130

JO - International Journal of Sociology

JF - International Journal of Sociology

SN - 0020-7659

IS - 2

ER -