166 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Naturalistic studies can potentially be used to detect accidents of vulnerable road users and thus overcome the large degree of under-reporting in the official accident records. In this study, simulated cycling and walking accidents were performed by a stunt man and with a crash test dummy to test how they differ from each other and the potential implications of using simulated accidents as an alternative to real accidents. The study consisted of simulations of common accident types for cyclists and pedestrians, such as tripping over a curb or falling of the bike after hitting an obstacle. Motion data in terms of acceleration and rotation as well as the state of the screen (turned on/off) was collected via an Android smartphone to use as indicators for the motion patterns during accidents. The results show that dummy data have a distinct peak at the moment of the fall as a result of not being able to break the fall. As opposed to this, the stuntman arranges himself in a way to reduce the impact when hitting the ground. In real accidents, motion patterns will probably lie in-between these two types.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdatojun. 2017
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2017
Begivenhed6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium - The Hague, Holland
Varighed: 8 jun. 20179 jun. 2017

Konference

Konference6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium
LandHolland
ByThe Hague
Periode08/06/201709/06/2017

Fingerprint

Accidents
Testing
Curbs
Smartphones

Citer dette

Madsen, T. K. O., Christensen, M. B., Andersen, C. S., Várhelyi, A., Laureshyn, A., Moeslund, T. B., & Lahrmann, H. S. (2017). Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data. Abstract fra 6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium, The Hague, Holland.
Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann ; Christensen, Mads Bock ; Andersen, Camilla Sloth ; Várhelyi, András ; Laureshyn, Aliaksei ; Moeslund, Thomas B. ; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk. / Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data. Abstract fra 6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium, The Hague, Holland.
@conference{9567a01c3fb74459968905f110cd06dc,
title = "Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data",
abstract = "Naturalistic studies can potentially be used to detect accidents of vulnerable road users and thus overcome the large degree of under-reporting in the official accident records. In this study, simulated cycling and walking accidents were performed by a stunt man and with a crash test dummy to test how they differ from each other and the potential implications of using simulated accidents as an alternative to real accidents. The study consisted of simulations of common accident types for cyclists and pedestrians, such as tripping over a curb or falling of the bike after hitting an obstacle. Motion data in terms of acceleration and rotation as well as the state of the screen (turned on/off) was collected via an Android smartphone to use as indicators for the motion patterns during accidents. The results show that dummy data have a distinct peak at the moment of the fall as a result of not being able to break the fall. As opposed to this, the stuntman arranges himself in a way to reduce the impact when hitting the ground. In real accidents, motion patterns will probably lie in-between these two types.",
author = "Madsen, {Tanja Kidholm Osmann} and Christensen, {Mads Bock} and Andersen, {Camilla Sloth} and Andr{\'a}s V{\'a}rhelyi and Aliaksei Laureshyn and Moeslund, {Thomas B.} and Lahrmann, {Harry Spaab{\ae}k}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 08-06-2017 Through 09-06-2017",

}

Madsen, TKO, Christensen, MB, Andersen, CS, Várhelyi, A, Laureshyn, A, Moeslund, TB & Lahrmann, HS 2017, 'Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data' 6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium, The Hague, Holland, 08/06/2017 - 09/06/2017, .

Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data. / Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann; Christensen, Mads Bock; Andersen, Camilla Sloth; Várhelyi, András; Laureshyn, Aliaksei; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk.

2017. Abstract fra 6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium, The Hague, Holland.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data

AU - Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann

AU - Christensen, Mads Bock

AU - Andersen, Camilla Sloth

AU - Várhelyi, András

AU - Laureshyn, Aliaksei

AU - Moeslund, Thomas B.

AU - Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk

PY - 2017/6

Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - Naturalistic studies can potentially be used to detect accidents of vulnerable road users and thus overcome the large degree of under-reporting in the official accident records. In this study, simulated cycling and walking accidents were performed by a stunt man and with a crash test dummy to test how they differ from each other and the potential implications of using simulated accidents as an alternative to real accidents. The study consisted of simulations of common accident types for cyclists and pedestrians, such as tripping over a curb or falling of the bike after hitting an obstacle. Motion data in terms of acceleration and rotation as well as the state of the screen (turned on/off) was collected via an Android smartphone to use as indicators for the motion patterns during accidents. The results show that dummy data have a distinct peak at the moment of the fall as a result of not being able to break the fall. As opposed to this, the stuntman arranges himself in a way to reduce the impact when hitting the ground. In real accidents, motion patterns will probably lie in-between these two types.

AB - Naturalistic studies can potentially be used to detect accidents of vulnerable road users and thus overcome the large degree of under-reporting in the official accident records. In this study, simulated cycling and walking accidents were performed by a stunt man and with a crash test dummy to test how they differ from each other and the potential implications of using simulated accidents as an alternative to real accidents. The study consisted of simulations of common accident types for cyclists and pedestrians, such as tripping over a curb or falling of the bike after hitting an obstacle. Motion data in terms of acceleration and rotation as well as the state of the screen (turned on/off) was collected via an Android smartphone to use as indicators for the motion patterns during accidents. The results show that dummy data have a distinct peak at the moment of the fall as a result of not being able to break the fall. As opposed to this, the stuntman arranges himself in a way to reduce the impact when hitting the ground. In real accidents, motion patterns will probably lie in-between these two types.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Madsen TKO, Christensen MB, Andersen CS, Várhelyi A, Laureshyn A, Moeslund TB et al. Comparison of two simulation methods for testing of algorithms to detect cyclist and pedestrian accidents in naturalistic data. 2017. Abstract fra 6th International Naturalistic Driving Research Symposium, The Hague, Holland.