Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function

C Leone, A Dufour, G Di Stefano, A Fasolino, A Di Lionardo, S La Cesa, E Galosi, M Valeriani, M Nolano, G Cruccu, A Truini

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In this clinical and neurophysiological study using a novel cold stimulator, we aim at investigating whether cold-evoked potentials (CEPs) may prove to be a reliable diagnostic tool to assess trigeminal small-fibre function. Using a novel device consisting of micro-Peltier elements, we recorded CEPs after stimulating the supraorbital and perioral regions and the hand dorsum in 15 healthy participants and in 2 patients with exemplary facial neuropathic pain conditions. We measured peripheral conduction velocity at the upper arm and studied the brain generators using source analysis. In healthy participants and patients, we also compared CEPs with laser-evoked potentials. In the healthy participants, cold stimulation evoked reproducible scalp potentials, similar to those elicited by laser pulses, although with a latency of about 30 ms longer. The mean peripheral conduction velocity, estimated at the upper arm, was 12.7 m/seconds. The main waves of the scalp potentials originated from the anterior cingulate gyrus and were preceded by activity in the bilateral opercular regions and bilateral dorsolateral frontal regions. Unlike laser stimulation, cold stimulation evoked scalp potential of similar amplitude across perioral, supraorbital, and hand dorsum stimulation. In patients with facial neuropathic pain, CEP recording showed the selective damage of cold pathways providing complementary information to laser-evoked potential recording. Our clinical and neurophysiological study shows that this new device provides reliable information on trigeminal small fibres mediating cold sensation and might be useful for investigating patients with facial neuropathic pain associated with a distinct damage of cold-mediating fibres.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPain
Vol/bind160
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)1967-1975
Antal sider9
ISSN0304-3959
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2019

Fingerprint

Skin
Evoked Potentials
Facial Pain
Neuralgia
Scalp
Healthy Volunteers
Lasers
Arm
Hand
Equipment and Supplies
Gyrus Cinguli
Brain

Citer dette

Leone, C., Dufour, A., Di Stefano, G., Fasolino, A., Di Lionardo, A., La Cesa, S., ... Truini, A. (2019). Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function. Pain, 160(9), 1967-1975. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001584
Leone, C ; Dufour, A ; Di Stefano, G ; Fasolino, A ; Di Lionardo, A ; La Cesa, S ; Galosi, E ; Valeriani, M ; Nolano, M ; Cruccu, G ; Truini, A. / Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function. I: Pain. 2019 ; Bind 160, Nr. 9. s. 1967-1975.
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title = "Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function",
abstract = "In this clinical and neurophysiological study using a novel cold stimulator, we aim at investigating whether cold-evoked potentials (CEPs) may prove to be a reliable diagnostic tool to assess trigeminal small-fibre function. Using a novel device consisting of micro-Peltier elements, we recorded CEPs after stimulating the supraorbital and perioral regions and the hand dorsum in 15 healthy participants and in 2 patients with exemplary facial neuropathic pain conditions. We measured peripheral conduction velocity at the upper arm and studied the brain generators using source analysis. In healthy participants and patients, we also compared CEPs with laser-evoked potentials. In the healthy participants, cold stimulation evoked reproducible scalp potentials, similar to those elicited by laser pulses, although with a latency of about 30 ms longer. The mean peripheral conduction velocity, estimated at the upper arm, was 12.7 m/seconds. The main waves of the scalp potentials originated from the anterior cingulate gyrus and were preceded by activity in the bilateral opercular regions and bilateral dorsolateral frontal regions. Unlike laser stimulation, cold stimulation evoked scalp potential of similar amplitude across perioral, supraorbital, and hand dorsum stimulation. In patients with facial neuropathic pain, CEP recording showed the selective damage of cold pathways providing complementary information to laser-evoked potential recording. Our clinical and neurophysiological study shows that this new device provides reliable information on trigeminal small fibres mediating cold sensation and might be useful for investigating patients with facial neuropathic pain associated with a distinct damage of cold-mediating fibres.",
author = "C Leone and A Dufour and {Di Stefano}, G and A Fasolino and {Di Lionardo}, A and {La Cesa}, S and E Galosi and M Valeriani and M Nolano and G Cruccu and A Truini",
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Leone, C, Dufour, A, Di Stefano, G, Fasolino, A, Di Lionardo, A, La Cesa, S, Galosi, E, Valeriani, M, Nolano, M, Cruccu, G & Truini, A 2019, 'Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function', Pain, bind 160, nr. 9, s. 1967-1975. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001584

Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function. / Leone, C; Dufour, A; Di Stefano, G; Fasolino, A; Di Lionardo, A; La Cesa, S; Galosi, E; Valeriani, M; Nolano, M; Cruccu, G; Truini, A.

I: Pain, Bind 160, Nr. 9, 09.2019, s. 1967-1975.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function

AU - Leone, C

AU - Dufour, A

AU - Di Stefano, G

AU - Fasolino, A

AU - Di Lionardo, A

AU - La Cesa, S

AU - Galosi, E

AU - Valeriani, M

AU - Nolano, M

AU - Cruccu, G

AU - Truini, A

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - In this clinical and neurophysiological study using a novel cold stimulator, we aim at investigating whether cold-evoked potentials (CEPs) may prove to be a reliable diagnostic tool to assess trigeminal small-fibre function. Using a novel device consisting of micro-Peltier elements, we recorded CEPs after stimulating the supraorbital and perioral regions and the hand dorsum in 15 healthy participants and in 2 patients with exemplary facial neuropathic pain conditions. We measured peripheral conduction velocity at the upper arm and studied the brain generators using source analysis. In healthy participants and patients, we also compared CEPs with laser-evoked potentials. In the healthy participants, cold stimulation evoked reproducible scalp potentials, similar to those elicited by laser pulses, although with a latency of about 30 ms longer. The mean peripheral conduction velocity, estimated at the upper arm, was 12.7 m/seconds. The main waves of the scalp potentials originated from the anterior cingulate gyrus and were preceded by activity in the bilateral opercular regions and bilateral dorsolateral frontal regions. Unlike laser stimulation, cold stimulation evoked scalp potential of similar amplitude across perioral, supraorbital, and hand dorsum stimulation. In patients with facial neuropathic pain, CEP recording showed the selective damage of cold pathways providing complementary information to laser-evoked potential recording. Our clinical and neurophysiological study shows that this new device provides reliable information on trigeminal small fibres mediating cold sensation and might be useful for investigating patients with facial neuropathic pain associated with a distinct damage of cold-mediating fibres.

AB - In this clinical and neurophysiological study using a novel cold stimulator, we aim at investigating whether cold-evoked potentials (CEPs) may prove to be a reliable diagnostic tool to assess trigeminal small-fibre function. Using a novel device consisting of micro-Peltier elements, we recorded CEPs after stimulating the supraorbital and perioral regions and the hand dorsum in 15 healthy participants and in 2 patients with exemplary facial neuropathic pain conditions. We measured peripheral conduction velocity at the upper arm and studied the brain generators using source analysis. In healthy participants and patients, we also compared CEPs with laser-evoked potentials. In the healthy participants, cold stimulation evoked reproducible scalp potentials, similar to those elicited by laser pulses, although with a latency of about 30 ms longer. The mean peripheral conduction velocity, estimated at the upper arm, was 12.7 m/seconds. The main waves of the scalp potentials originated from the anterior cingulate gyrus and were preceded by activity in the bilateral opercular regions and bilateral dorsolateral frontal regions. Unlike laser stimulation, cold stimulation evoked scalp potential of similar amplitude across perioral, supraorbital, and hand dorsum stimulation. In patients with facial neuropathic pain, CEP recording showed the selective damage of cold pathways providing complementary information to laser-evoked potential recording. Our clinical and neurophysiological study shows that this new device provides reliable information on trigeminal small fibres mediating cold sensation and might be useful for investigating patients with facial neuropathic pain associated with a distinct damage of cold-mediating fibres.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071707479&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001584

DO - 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001584

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30985621

VL - 160

SP - 1967

EP - 1975

JO - Pain

JF - Pain

SN - 0304-3959

IS - 9

ER -

Leone C, Dufour A, Di Stefano G, Fasolino A, Di Lionardo A, La Cesa S et al. Cooling the skin for assessing small-fibre function. Pain. 2019 sep;160(9):1967-1975. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001584