Creative Precarity? Young Fashion Designers as Entrepreneurs in Russia

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Resumé

This article explores the careers of young fashion designers as entrepreneurs in Russia. It discusses entrepreneurial experiences and labour practices of fashion designers in the context of precarity: that is, the structural conditions characterized by a lack of social, economic and emotional security caused by a shift of responsibilities for the labour market from the state to the citizens. The article takes the perspective of designers’ agency and answers the question of how young fashion entrepreneurs deal with such structural conditions using state support, community support, organizational practices and emotional management. The article also focuses on creative labour in the broader context of the circumstances of a creative class in an authoritarian state. We argue that in today’s Russia, the discourse on the creative class is perhaps more important than the discourse on precarity, since belonging to the creative class is a source of political identity for fashion designers. The issue of precarity, then, can become a further basis for solidarity and political action. The research draws from 21 in-depth interviews with fashion designers and experts conducted in the cities of Moscow, St. Petersburg and Novosibirsk between 2015 and 2016.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCultural Studies
Vol/bind32
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)704-726
Antal sider23
ISSN0950-2386
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 3 sep. 2018

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entrepreneur
Russia
labor
political identity
discourse
political action
social economics
solidarity
labor market
career
expert
citizen
responsibility
lack
interview
management
community
Fashion Designer
Entrepreneurs
experience

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    Creative Precarity? Young Fashion Designers as Entrepreneurs in Russia. / Gurova, Olga; Morozova, Daria.

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    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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