Deacclimation after cold acclimation - a crucial, but widely neglected part of plant winter survival

Kora Vyse, Majken Pagter, Ellen Zuther, Dirk K Hincha

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Temperate and boreal plants show natural low temperature acclimation during fall. This cold acclimation process results in increased freezing tolerance. Global climate change leads to increasing spring and fall temperatures triggering deacclimation and loss of freezing tolerance, making plants susceptible to both late fall and late spring freezing events. In particular spring frosts can have devastating effects on whole ecosystems and can significantly reduce the yield of crop plants. Although the timing and speed of deacclimation are clearly of crucial importance for plant winter survival, the molecular basis of this process is still largely unknown. The regulation of deacclimation is, however, not only related to freezing tolerance, but also to the termination of dormancy, and the initiation of growth and development. In the present paper, we provide an overview of what is known about deacclimation in both woody and herbaceous plants. We further use publicly available transcriptome data to identify a core set of deacclimation-related genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that highlight physiological determinants of deacclimation and suggest important directions for future research in this area.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Experimental Biology
ISSN0022-0949
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 14 maj 2019

Fingerprint

Acclimatization
acclimation
overwintering
plant anatomy
freezing
Freezing
tolerance
winter
cold tolerance
crop plant
dormancy
woody plant
Temperature
growth and development
Climate Change
herb
global climate
Growth and Development
Transcriptome
Arabidopsis

Bibliografisk note

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

Citer dette

@article{a531e854a2e0473a8a4ca2ad0bcdda96,
title = "Deacclimation after cold acclimation - a crucial, but widely neglected part of plant winter survival",
abstract = "Temperate and boreal plants show natural low temperature acclimation during fall. This cold acclimation process results in increased freezing tolerance. Global climate change leads to increasing spring and fall temperatures triggering deacclimation and loss of freezing tolerance, making plants susceptible to both late fall and late spring freezing events. In particular spring frosts can have devastating effects on whole ecosystems and can significantly reduce the yield of crop plants. Although the timing and speed of deacclimation are clearly of crucial importance for plant winter survival, the molecular basis of this process is still largely unknown. The regulation of deacclimation is, however, not only related to freezing tolerance, but also to the termination of dormancy, and the initiation of growth and development. In the present paper, we provide an overview of what is known about deacclimation in both woody and herbaceous plants. We further use publicly available transcriptome data to identify a core set of deacclimation-related genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that highlight physiological determinants of deacclimation and suggest important directions for future research in this area.",
author = "Kora Vyse and Majken Pagter and Ellen Zuther and Hincha, {Dirk K}",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1093/jxb/erz229",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Biology",
issn = "0022-0949",
publisher = "The/Company of Biologists Ltd.",

}

Deacclimation after cold acclimation - a crucial, but widely neglected part of plant winter survival. / Vyse, Kora; Pagter, Majken; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K.

I: Journal of Experimental Biology, 14.05.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deacclimation after cold acclimation - a crucial, but widely neglected part of plant winter survival

AU - Vyse, Kora

AU - Pagter, Majken

AU - Zuther, Ellen

AU - Hincha, Dirk K

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

PY - 2019/5/14

Y1 - 2019/5/14

N2 - Temperate and boreal plants show natural low temperature acclimation during fall. This cold acclimation process results in increased freezing tolerance. Global climate change leads to increasing spring and fall temperatures triggering deacclimation and loss of freezing tolerance, making plants susceptible to both late fall and late spring freezing events. In particular spring frosts can have devastating effects on whole ecosystems and can significantly reduce the yield of crop plants. Although the timing and speed of deacclimation are clearly of crucial importance for plant winter survival, the molecular basis of this process is still largely unknown. The regulation of deacclimation is, however, not only related to freezing tolerance, but also to the termination of dormancy, and the initiation of growth and development. In the present paper, we provide an overview of what is known about deacclimation in both woody and herbaceous plants. We further use publicly available transcriptome data to identify a core set of deacclimation-related genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that highlight physiological determinants of deacclimation and suggest important directions for future research in this area.

AB - Temperate and boreal plants show natural low temperature acclimation during fall. This cold acclimation process results in increased freezing tolerance. Global climate change leads to increasing spring and fall temperatures triggering deacclimation and loss of freezing tolerance, making plants susceptible to both late fall and late spring freezing events. In particular spring frosts can have devastating effects on whole ecosystems and can significantly reduce the yield of crop plants. Although the timing and speed of deacclimation are clearly of crucial importance for plant winter survival, the molecular basis of this process is still largely unknown. The regulation of deacclimation is, however, not only related to freezing tolerance, but also to the termination of dormancy, and the initiation of growth and development. In the present paper, we provide an overview of what is known about deacclimation in both woody and herbaceous plants. We further use publicly available transcriptome data to identify a core set of deacclimation-related genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that highlight physiological determinants of deacclimation and suggest important directions for future research in this area.

U2 - 10.1093/jxb/erz229

DO - 10.1093/jxb/erz229

M3 - Journal article

JO - Journal of Experimental Biology

JF - Journal of Experimental Biology

SN - 0022-0949

ER -