Effectiveness of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents: A controlled study

Christian Gold

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportPh.d.-afhandlingForskning

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Resumé

This research addressed the efficacy and effectiveness of music therapy for
children and adolescents with mental disorders. Findings from previous experimental
research, as summarised in a meta-analysis, suggest that music therapy is an efficacious
treatment with a medium to large effect size. However, little is known about its
effectiveness in clinical settings and about factors that might influence its effectiveness.
A controlled quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used to assess the
development in children and adolescents who received on average 23 weekly sessions
of music therapy (n = 75) in comparison to others who were waiting or had been
recommended for therapy (n = 61). Primary diagnoses included adjustment disorders
and emotional disorders (27%), behavioural disorders (26%), and developmental
disorders (46%). Outcomes were measured with standardised instruments for
symptoms, competencies (Child Behaviour Checklist), and quality of life (Munich
health-related quality of life questionnaire KINDL), and other questionnaires.
The results of an overall ANOVA showed no significant treatment effects,
although effect sizes for quality of life were in the small to medium range. Further
ANOVAs addressing clinical sub-groups suggested that the effectiveness of music
therapy depends on the presence of comorbid medical conditions (p < .01) and on the
frequent use of media and activities other than music and verbal reflection in music
therapy (p < .01). Other influences included age, primary diagnosis, therapist's gender,
experience and training, and number of music therapy sessions. The results suggest that
music therapy is effective for clients without comorbid medical conditions, and more
effective when other media and activities are not included on a regular basis.
OriginalsprogDansk
Antal sider304
StatusUdgivet - 2003

Citer dette

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title = "Effectiveness of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents: A controlled study",
abstract = "This research addressed the efficacy and effectiveness of music therapy for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Findings from previous experimental research, as summarised in a meta-analysis, suggest that music therapy is an efficacious treatment with a medium to large effect size. However, little is known about its effectiveness in clinical settings and about factors that might influence its effectiveness. A controlled quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used to assess the development in children and adolescents who received on average 23 weekly sessions of music therapy (n = 75) in comparison to others who were waiting or had been recommended for therapy (n = 61). Primary diagnoses included adjustment disorders and emotional disorders (27{\%}), behavioural disorders (26{\%}), and developmental disorders (46{\%}). Outcomes were measured with standardised instruments for symptoms, competencies (Child Behaviour Checklist), and quality of life (Munich health-related quality of life questionnaire KINDL), and other questionnaires. The results of an overall ANOVA showed no significant treatment effects, although effect sizes for quality of life were in the small to medium range. Further ANOVAs addressing clinical sub-groups suggested that the effectiveness of music therapy depends on the presence of comorbid medical conditions (p < .01) and on the frequent use of media and activities other than music and verbal reflection in music therapy (p < .01). Other influences included age, primary diagnosis, therapist's gender, experience and training, and number of music therapy sessions. The results suggest that music therapy is effective for clients without comorbid medical conditions, and more effective when other media and activities are not included on a regular basis.",
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year = "2003",
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Effectiveness of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents: A controlled study. / Gold, Christian.

2003. 304 s.

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportPh.d.-afhandlingForskning

TY - BOOK

T1 - Effectiveness of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents: A controlled study

AU - Gold, Christian

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - This research addressed the efficacy and effectiveness of music therapy for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Findings from previous experimental research, as summarised in a meta-analysis, suggest that music therapy is an efficacious treatment with a medium to large effect size. However, little is known about its effectiveness in clinical settings and about factors that might influence its effectiveness. A controlled quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used to assess the development in children and adolescents who received on average 23 weekly sessions of music therapy (n = 75) in comparison to others who were waiting or had been recommended for therapy (n = 61). Primary diagnoses included adjustment disorders and emotional disorders (27%), behavioural disorders (26%), and developmental disorders (46%). Outcomes were measured with standardised instruments for symptoms, competencies (Child Behaviour Checklist), and quality of life (Munich health-related quality of life questionnaire KINDL), and other questionnaires. The results of an overall ANOVA showed no significant treatment effects, although effect sizes for quality of life were in the small to medium range. Further ANOVAs addressing clinical sub-groups suggested that the effectiveness of music therapy depends on the presence of comorbid medical conditions (p < .01) and on the frequent use of media and activities other than music and verbal reflection in music therapy (p < .01). Other influences included age, primary diagnosis, therapist's gender, experience and training, and number of music therapy sessions. The results suggest that music therapy is effective for clients without comorbid medical conditions, and more effective when other media and activities are not included on a regular basis.

AB - This research addressed the efficacy and effectiveness of music therapy for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Findings from previous experimental research, as summarised in a meta-analysis, suggest that music therapy is an efficacious treatment with a medium to large effect size. However, little is known about its effectiveness in clinical settings and about factors that might influence its effectiveness. A controlled quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used to assess the development in children and adolescents who received on average 23 weekly sessions of music therapy (n = 75) in comparison to others who were waiting or had been recommended for therapy (n = 61). Primary diagnoses included adjustment disorders and emotional disorders (27%), behavioural disorders (26%), and developmental disorders (46%). Outcomes were measured with standardised instruments for symptoms, competencies (Child Behaviour Checklist), and quality of life (Munich health-related quality of life questionnaire KINDL), and other questionnaires. The results of an overall ANOVA showed no significant treatment effects, although effect sizes for quality of life were in the small to medium range. Further ANOVAs addressing clinical sub-groups suggested that the effectiveness of music therapy depends on the presence of comorbid medical conditions (p < .01) and on the frequent use of media and activities other than music and verbal reflection in music therapy (p < .01). Other influences included age, primary diagnosis, therapist's gender, experience and training, and number of music therapy sessions. The results suggest that music therapy is effective for clients without comorbid medical conditions, and more effective when other media and activities are not included on a regular basis.

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