Finding your ideal (foreign) non-academic partner

Implications for university-industry collaboration, in peripheral and metropolitan regions?

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaper uden forlag/tidsskriftForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper develops a theoretical framework, and a set of testable propositions, on how collaboration with non-academic partners located abroad might affect businesses’ absorptive capacity, and businesses’ propensity to engage in collaboration with universities, depending on the characteristics of the region. The present document also includes a research agenda with the goal of testing the propositions, in a further developed version of the paper. It is hypothesized that businesses in peripheral regions will be able to develop their absorptive capacity to a greater extent, if they are engaged in collaboration with foreign non-academic partners, and that these improvements in absorptive capacity will increase the ability of businesses to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that peripheral regions will provide access to a small variety of potential non-academic partners (such as suppliers, customers, competitors or technical centres). Because of this limitation, firms might have a harder time in finding non-academic partners from which they can learn (that is, partners that can provide access to novel knowledge, but similar enough to facilitate learning). Those firms that collaborate with foreign non-academic partners, however, can have an easier time in contacting partners from which they can learn, and these engagements can incentivise that businesses develop their absorptive capacity, and their propensity to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is also hypothesized that businesses in metropolitan regions will not increase their absorptive capacity as a result of collaborating with foreign non-academic partners, and that these collaborations will not increase the likelihood that businesses in metropolitan regions engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that due to the broader variety of organisations available in metropolitan regions, businesses will not have to opt for international collaboration, in order to contact non-academic partners from which they can learn.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdatojan. 2018
Antal sider15
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2018
BegivenhedDRUID Academy Conference 2018 - South Denmark University, Odense, Danmark
Varighed: 17 jan. 201819 jan. 2018

Konference

KonferenceDRUID Academy Conference 2018
LokationSouth Denmark University
LandDanmark
ByOdense
Periode17/01/201819/01/2018

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University-industry collaboration
Absorptive capacity
Propensity
Peripheral regions
Research agenda
Suppliers
Competitors
Theoretical framework
Testing

Citer dette

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note = "DRUID Academy Conference 2018 ; Conference date: 17-01-2018 Through 19-01-2018",

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Finding your ideal (foreign) non-academic partner : Implications for university-industry collaboration, in peripheral and metropolitan regions? / Guerrero, David Fernández.

2018. Afhandling præsenteret på DRUID Academy Conference 2018, Odense, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaper uden forlag/tidsskriftForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Finding your ideal (foreign) non-academic partner

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AU - Guerrero, David Fernández

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N2 - This paper develops a theoretical framework, and a set of testable propositions, on how collaboration with non-academic partners located abroad might affect businesses’ absorptive capacity, and businesses’ propensity to engage in collaboration with universities, depending on the characteristics of the region. The present document also includes a research agenda with the goal of testing the propositions, in a further developed version of the paper. It is hypothesized that businesses in peripheral regions will be able to develop their absorptive capacity to a greater extent, if they are engaged in collaboration with foreign non-academic partners, and that these improvements in absorptive capacity will increase the ability of businesses to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that peripheral regions will provide access to a small variety of potential non-academic partners (such as suppliers, customers, competitors or technical centres). Because of this limitation, firms might have a harder time in finding non-academic partners from which they can learn (that is, partners that can provide access to novel knowledge, but similar enough to facilitate learning). Those firms that collaborate with foreign non-academic partners, however, can have an easier time in contacting partners from which they can learn, and these engagements can incentivise that businesses develop their absorptive capacity, and their propensity to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is also hypothesized that businesses in metropolitan regions will not increase their absorptive capacity as a result of collaborating with foreign non-academic partners, and that these collaborations will not increase the likelihood that businesses in metropolitan regions engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that due to the broader variety of organisations available in metropolitan regions, businesses will not have to opt for international collaboration, in order to contact non-academic partners from which they can learn.

AB - This paper develops a theoretical framework, and a set of testable propositions, on how collaboration with non-academic partners located abroad might affect businesses’ absorptive capacity, and businesses’ propensity to engage in collaboration with universities, depending on the characteristics of the region. The present document also includes a research agenda with the goal of testing the propositions, in a further developed version of the paper. It is hypothesized that businesses in peripheral regions will be able to develop their absorptive capacity to a greater extent, if they are engaged in collaboration with foreign non-academic partners, and that these improvements in absorptive capacity will increase the ability of businesses to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that peripheral regions will provide access to a small variety of potential non-academic partners (such as suppliers, customers, competitors or technical centres). Because of this limitation, firms might have a harder time in finding non-academic partners from which they can learn (that is, partners that can provide access to novel knowledge, but similar enough to facilitate learning). Those firms that collaborate with foreign non-academic partners, however, can have an easier time in contacting partners from which they can learn, and these engagements can incentivise that businesses develop their absorptive capacity, and their propensity to engage in university-industry collaboration. It is also hypothesized that businesses in metropolitan regions will not increase their absorptive capacity as a result of collaborating with foreign non-academic partners, and that these collaborations will not increase the likelihood that businesses in metropolitan regions engage in university-industry collaboration. It is assumed that due to the broader variety of organisations available in metropolitan regions, businesses will not have to opt for international collaboration, in order to contact non-academic partners from which they can learn.

KW - Regional innovation systems

KW - Regional development

KW - Universities

KW - Innovation

KW - Absorptive capacity

M3 - Paper without publisher/journal

ER -