Gradual consolidation of synesthesia during adolescence

A case study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

Resumé

Synesthesia is a rare condition in the normal observer where an inducer quale is consistently followed by a second, concurrent quale (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001). Several studies have demonstrated the effects of synesthesia through a number of objective measures; like visual search (Laeng, 2009), visual priming (Mattingley, Rich, Yelland, & Bradshaw, 2001), and the Stroop task (Mills, Boteler, & Oliver, 1999). In a recent study Ásgeirsson, Nordfang, & Sørensen (2015) isolated specific components of attention that are modulated by synesthesia, and which seem to correspond to attentional changes modulated by expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, in review). Here we explore a case of a young female synesthete; AR (age 13), who presented an unusual, but consistent, color profile that allowed us to explore the effects of partial color encoding in synesthesia. Interestingly, we were not able to reproduce the attentional modulations reported by Ásgeirsson et al. (2015) as AR did not show any convincing modulation of known attentional parameters.Several studies have demonstrated that synesthesia can be acquired during childhood (e.g. Witthoft & Winawer, 2006), and recently Simner & Bain (2013) has convincingly shown that consolidation of colour-grapheme synaesthesia develop during childhood and early adolescence. Together these studies seem to suggest that the attentional effects seen in adult observers who have colour-grapheme synaesthesia may in fact reflect an expertise related modulation between long-term colour-grapheme associations.To explore this hypothesis a follow-up screening of AR’s colour-grapheme associations revealed that a number of letters are still settling on their final colour association – colour changes that AR herself was unaware of, e.g. that L had changed from red to blue. Additionally, AR’s overall consistency also markedly increased over the ~2 year between the screening sessions, similar to results reported by Simner & Bain (2013).
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Vision
ISSN1534-7362
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016
BegivenhedAnnual meeting of the Visual Science Society - The Tradewinds Island Resorts, St. Pete Beach, FL, USA
Varighed: 13 maj 201618 maj 2016
http://www.visionsciences.org/

Konference

KonferenceAnnual meeting of the Visual Science Society
LokationThe Tradewinds Island Resorts
LandUSA
BySt. Pete Beach, FL
Periode13/05/201618/05/2016
Internetadresse

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Color
Synesthesia

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title = "Gradual consolidation of synesthesia during adolescence: A case study",
abstract = "Synesthesia is a rare condition in the normal observer where an inducer quale is consistently followed by a second, concurrent quale (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001). Several studies have demonstrated the effects of synesthesia through a number of objective measures; like visual search (Laeng, 2009), visual priming (Mattingley, Rich, Yelland, & Bradshaw, 2001), and the Stroop task (Mills, Boteler, & Oliver, 1999). In a recent study {\'A}sgeirsson, Nordfang, & S{\o}rensen (2015) isolated specific components of attention that are modulated by synesthesia, and which seem to correspond to attentional changes modulated by expertise (S{\o}rensen & Kyllingsb{\ae}k, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & S{\o}rensen, in review). Here we explore a case of a young female synesthete; AR (age 13), who presented an unusual, but consistent, color profile that allowed us to explore the effects of partial color encoding in synesthesia. Interestingly, we were not able to reproduce the attentional modulations reported by {\'A}sgeirsson et al. (2015) as AR did not show any convincing modulation of known attentional parameters.Several studies have demonstrated that synesthesia can be acquired during childhood (e.g. Witthoft & Winawer, 2006), and recently Simner & Bain (2013) has convincingly shown that consolidation of colour-grapheme synaesthesia develop during childhood and early adolescence. Together these studies seem to suggest that the attentional effects seen in adult observers who have colour-grapheme synaesthesia may in fact reflect an expertise related modulation between long-term colour-grapheme associations.To explore this hypothesis a follow-up screening of AR’s colour-grapheme associations revealed that a number of letters are still settling on their final colour association – colour changes that AR herself was unaware of, e.g. that L had changed from red to blue. Additionally, AR’s overall consistency also markedly increased over the ~2 year between the screening sessions, similar to results reported by Simner & Bain (2013).",
author = "S{\o}rensen, {Thomas Alrik} and Maria Nordfang and {\'A}sgeirsson, {{\'A}rni Gunnar}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1167/16.12.460",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Vision",
issn = "1534-7362",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology",

}

Gradual consolidation of synesthesia during adolescence : A case study. / Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Nordfang, Maria; Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar.

I: Journal of Vision, 2016.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Gradual consolidation of synesthesia during adolescence

T2 - A case study

AU - Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

AU - Nordfang, Maria

AU - Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Synesthesia is a rare condition in the normal observer where an inducer quale is consistently followed by a second, concurrent quale (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001). Several studies have demonstrated the effects of synesthesia through a number of objective measures; like visual search (Laeng, 2009), visual priming (Mattingley, Rich, Yelland, & Bradshaw, 2001), and the Stroop task (Mills, Boteler, & Oliver, 1999). In a recent study Ásgeirsson, Nordfang, & Sørensen (2015) isolated specific components of attention that are modulated by synesthesia, and which seem to correspond to attentional changes modulated by expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, in review). Here we explore a case of a young female synesthete; AR (age 13), who presented an unusual, but consistent, color profile that allowed us to explore the effects of partial color encoding in synesthesia. Interestingly, we were not able to reproduce the attentional modulations reported by Ásgeirsson et al. (2015) as AR did not show any convincing modulation of known attentional parameters.Several studies have demonstrated that synesthesia can be acquired during childhood (e.g. Witthoft & Winawer, 2006), and recently Simner & Bain (2013) has convincingly shown that consolidation of colour-grapheme synaesthesia develop during childhood and early adolescence. Together these studies seem to suggest that the attentional effects seen in adult observers who have colour-grapheme synaesthesia may in fact reflect an expertise related modulation between long-term colour-grapheme associations.To explore this hypothesis a follow-up screening of AR’s colour-grapheme associations revealed that a number of letters are still settling on their final colour association – colour changes that AR herself was unaware of, e.g. that L had changed from red to blue. Additionally, AR’s overall consistency also markedly increased over the ~2 year between the screening sessions, similar to results reported by Simner & Bain (2013).

AB - Synesthesia is a rare condition in the normal observer where an inducer quale is consistently followed by a second, concurrent quale (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001). Several studies have demonstrated the effects of synesthesia through a number of objective measures; like visual search (Laeng, 2009), visual priming (Mattingley, Rich, Yelland, & Bradshaw, 2001), and the Stroop task (Mills, Boteler, & Oliver, 1999). In a recent study Ásgeirsson, Nordfang, & Sørensen (2015) isolated specific components of attention that are modulated by synesthesia, and which seem to correspond to attentional changes modulated by expertise (Sørensen & Kyllingsbæk, 2012; Dall, Watanabe, & Sørensen, in review). Here we explore a case of a young female synesthete; AR (age 13), who presented an unusual, but consistent, color profile that allowed us to explore the effects of partial color encoding in synesthesia. Interestingly, we were not able to reproduce the attentional modulations reported by Ásgeirsson et al. (2015) as AR did not show any convincing modulation of known attentional parameters.Several studies have demonstrated that synesthesia can be acquired during childhood (e.g. Witthoft & Winawer, 2006), and recently Simner & Bain (2013) has convincingly shown that consolidation of colour-grapheme synaesthesia develop during childhood and early adolescence. Together these studies seem to suggest that the attentional effects seen in adult observers who have colour-grapheme synaesthesia may in fact reflect an expertise related modulation between long-term colour-grapheme associations.To explore this hypothesis a follow-up screening of AR’s colour-grapheme associations revealed that a number of letters are still settling on their final colour association – colour changes that AR herself was unaware of, e.g. that L had changed from red to blue. Additionally, AR’s overall consistency also markedly increased over the ~2 year between the screening sessions, similar to results reported by Simner & Bain (2013).

U2 - 10.1167/16.12.460

DO - 10.1167/16.12.460

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

JO - Journal of Vision

JF - Journal of Vision

SN - 1534-7362

ER -