Assessing use-use interactions at sea

A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning

Bidragets oversatte titel: Håndtering af interaktioner mellem aktiviteter på havet: En teoretisk ramme for rumlige beslutningsværktøjer der understøtter sam-lokalisering af aktiviteter i havplanlægning

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer103533
TidsskriftMarine Policy
ISSN0308-597X
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Emneord

  • Co-location
  • Coexistence
  • Use-use interactions
  • Multi-use
  • Maritime spatial planning (MSP)
  • Spatial decision support tools (DSTs)
  • Geographical information systems (GIS)

Citer dette

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title = "Assessing use-use interactions at sea: A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning",
abstract = "The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.",
keywords = "Co-location, Coexistence, Use-use interactions, Multi-use, Maritime spatial planning (MSP), Spatial decision support tools (DSTs), Geographical information systems (GIS)",
author = "Reiter, {Ida Maria} and Hansen, {Henning Sten} and Lise Schr{\o}der",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
journal = "Marine Policy",
issn = "0308-597X",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing use-use interactions at sea

T2 - A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning

AU - Reiter, Ida Maria

AU - Hansen, Henning Sten

AU - Schrøder, Lise

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.

AB - The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.

KW - Co-location

KW - Coexistence

KW - Use-use interactions

KW - Multi-use

KW - Maritime spatial planning (MSP)

KW - Spatial decision support tools (DSTs)

KW - Geographical information systems (GIS)

UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18306729

M3 - Journal article

JO - Marine Policy

JF - Marine Policy

SN - 0308-597X

M1 - 103533

ER -