Heat hardening capacity in Drosophila melanogaster is life stage-specific and juveniles show the highest plasticity

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

19 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Variations in stress resistance and adaptive plastic responses during ontogeny have rarely been addressed, despite the possibility that differences between life stages can affect species' range margins and thermal tolerance. Here, we assessed the thermal sensitivity and hardening capacity of Drosophila melanogaster across developmental stages from larval to the adult stage. We observed strong differences between life stages in heat resistance, with adults being most heat resistant followed by puparia, pupae and larvae. The impact of heat hardening (1 h at 358C) on heat resistance changed during ontogeny, with the highest positive effect of hardening observed in puparia and pupae and the lowest in adults. These results suggest that immobile life stages (puparia and pupae) have evolved high plasticity in upper thermal limits whereas adults and larvae rely more on behavioural responses to heat stress allowing them to escape from extreme high temperatures. While most studies on the plasticity of heat resistance in ectotherms have focused on the adult life stage, our findings emphasize the crucial importance of juvenile life stages of arthropods in understanding the thermal biology and life stage-specific physiological responses to variable and stressful high temperatures. Failure to acknowledge this complication might lead to biased estimates of species' ability to cope with environmental changes, such as climate change.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer20180628
TidsskriftBiology Letters
Vol/bind15
Udgave nummer2
ISSN1744-9561
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 feb. 2019

Fingerprint

Drosophila melanogaster
heat tolerance
Hot Temperature
puparium
heat
pupae
Pupa
ontogeny
larvae
Larva
physiological response
stress tolerance
heat stress
arthropods
temperature
Heat-Shock Response
plastics
Temperature
Arthropods
climate change

Citer dette

@article{2451e82de51e4765aa5b3ec2c4688161,
title = "Heat hardening capacity in Drosophila melanogaster is life stage-specific and juveniles show the highest plasticity",
abstract = "Variations in stress resistance and adaptive plastic responses during ontogeny have rarely been addressed, despite the possibility that differences between life stages can affect species' range margins and thermal tolerance. Here, we assessed the thermal sensitivity and hardening capacity of Drosophila melanogaster across developmental stages from larval to the adult stage. We observed strong differences between life stages in heat resistance, with adults being most heat resistant followed by puparia, pupae and larvae. The impact of heat hardening (1 h at 358C) on heat resistance changed during ontogeny, with the highest positive effect of hardening observed in puparia and pupae and the lowest in adults. These results suggest that immobile life stages (puparia and pupae) have evolved high plasticity in upper thermal limits whereas adults and larvae rely more on behavioural responses to heat stress allowing them to escape from extreme high temperatures. While most studies on the plasticity of heat resistance in ectotherms have focused on the adult life stage, our findings emphasize the crucial importance of juvenile life stages of arthropods in understanding the thermal biology and life stage-specific physiological responses to variable and stressful high temperatures. Failure to acknowledge this complication might lead to biased estimates of species' ability to cope with environmental changes, such as climate change.",
keywords = "Climate change, Hardening, Heat resistance, Life stage-specific plasticity, Thermal sensitivity, Pupa, Heat-Shock Response, Animals, Larva, Hot Temperature, Drosophila melanogaster",
author = "Moghadam, {Neda Nasiri} and Tarmo Ketola and Pertoldi-Bianchi, {Cino Marco Frederico R{\o}nnow} and Simon Bahrndorff and Kristensen, {Torsten Nyg{\aa}rd}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1098/rsbl.2018.0628",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "Biology Letters",
issn = "1744-9561",
publisher = "The/Royal Society",
number = "2",

}

Heat hardening capacity in Drosophila melanogaster is life stage-specific and juveniles show the highest plasticity. / Moghadam, Neda Nasiri; Ketola, Tarmo; Pertoldi-Bianchi, Cino Marco Frederico Rønnow; Bahrndorff, Simon; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård.

I: Biology Letters, Bind 15, Nr. 2, 20180628, 01.02.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heat hardening capacity in Drosophila melanogaster is life stage-specific and juveniles show the highest plasticity

AU - Moghadam, Neda Nasiri

AU - Ketola, Tarmo

AU - Pertoldi-Bianchi, Cino Marco Frederico Rønnow

AU - Bahrndorff, Simon

AU - Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Variations in stress resistance and adaptive plastic responses during ontogeny have rarely been addressed, despite the possibility that differences between life stages can affect species' range margins and thermal tolerance. Here, we assessed the thermal sensitivity and hardening capacity of Drosophila melanogaster across developmental stages from larval to the adult stage. We observed strong differences between life stages in heat resistance, with adults being most heat resistant followed by puparia, pupae and larvae. The impact of heat hardening (1 h at 358C) on heat resistance changed during ontogeny, with the highest positive effect of hardening observed in puparia and pupae and the lowest in adults. These results suggest that immobile life stages (puparia and pupae) have evolved high plasticity in upper thermal limits whereas adults and larvae rely more on behavioural responses to heat stress allowing them to escape from extreme high temperatures. While most studies on the plasticity of heat resistance in ectotherms have focused on the adult life stage, our findings emphasize the crucial importance of juvenile life stages of arthropods in understanding the thermal biology and life stage-specific physiological responses to variable and stressful high temperatures. Failure to acknowledge this complication might lead to biased estimates of species' ability to cope with environmental changes, such as climate change.

AB - Variations in stress resistance and adaptive plastic responses during ontogeny have rarely been addressed, despite the possibility that differences between life stages can affect species' range margins and thermal tolerance. Here, we assessed the thermal sensitivity and hardening capacity of Drosophila melanogaster across developmental stages from larval to the adult stage. We observed strong differences between life stages in heat resistance, with adults being most heat resistant followed by puparia, pupae and larvae. The impact of heat hardening (1 h at 358C) on heat resistance changed during ontogeny, with the highest positive effect of hardening observed in puparia and pupae and the lowest in adults. These results suggest that immobile life stages (puparia and pupae) have evolved high plasticity in upper thermal limits whereas adults and larvae rely more on behavioural responses to heat stress allowing them to escape from extreme high temperatures. While most studies on the plasticity of heat resistance in ectotherms have focused on the adult life stage, our findings emphasize the crucial importance of juvenile life stages of arthropods in understanding the thermal biology and life stage-specific physiological responses to variable and stressful high temperatures. Failure to acknowledge this complication might lead to biased estimates of species' ability to cope with environmental changes, such as climate change.

KW - Climate change

KW - Hardening

KW - Heat resistance

KW - Life stage-specific plasticity

KW - Thermal sensitivity

KW - Pupa

KW - Heat-Shock Response

KW - Animals

KW - Larva

KW - Hot Temperature

KW - Drosophila melanogaster

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062797683&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0628

DO - 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0628

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30958125

VL - 15

JO - Biology Letters

JF - Biology Letters

SN - 1744-9561

IS - 2

M1 - 20180628

ER -