High pulse: How visitors experience an exhibition engaging families in co-creation, collaboration and dialogue

Marianne Lykke, Mette Skov, Christian Jantzen, Mette Stentoft Therkelsen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Science centres are often described as the third generation of science museums, characterised by experiential learning and interactive exhibits aimed at engaging visitors in understanding scientific phenomena rather than presenting collections of scientific objects. The aim of this paper is to explore how visitors interacted with an experiential exhibition on movement designed to stimulate co-creation, collaboration, and dialogue about the joy and importance of physical activity. The purpose of the study was to increase knowledge about how to design experiential exhibits. The study drew on data from 13 walking interviews (walk-along) with 48 visitors. The exhibition design proved to be very successful at activating visitors and motivating them to interaction, co-creation and collaboration. It was less successful at stimulating dialogue and reflection.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCurator
ISSN0011-3069
StatusAfsendt - 2018

Emneord

  • Exhibit design, science centres, experiential learning, walk along

Citer dette

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High pulse : How visitors experience an exhibition engaging families in co-creation, collaboration and dialogue. / Lykke, Marianne; Skov, Mette; Jantzen, Christian; Therkelsen, Mette Stentoft.

I: Curator, 2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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AU - Lykke, Marianne

AU - Skov, Mette

AU - Jantzen, Christian

AU - Therkelsen, Mette Stentoft

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Science centres are often described as the third generation of science museums, characterised by experiential learning and interactive exhibits aimed at engaging visitors in understanding scientific phenomena rather than presenting collections of scientific objects. The aim of this paper is to explore how visitors interacted with an experiential exhibition on movement designed to stimulate co-creation, collaboration, and dialogue about the joy and importance of physical activity. The purpose of the study was to increase knowledge about how to design experiential exhibits. The study drew on data from 13 walking interviews (walk-along) with 48 visitors. The exhibition design proved to be very successful at activating visitors and motivating them to interaction, co-creation and collaboration. It was less successful at stimulating dialogue and reflection.

AB - Science centres are often described as the third generation of science museums, characterised by experiential learning and interactive exhibits aimed at engaging visitors in understanding scientific phenomena rather than presenting collections of scientific objects. The aim of this paper is to explore how visitors interacted with an experiential exhibition on movement designed to stimulate co-creation, collaboration, and dialogue about the joy and importance of physical activity. The purpose of the study was to increase knowledge about how to design experiential exhibits. The study drew on data from 13 walking interviews (walk-along) with 48 visitors. The exhibition design proved to be very successful at activating visitors and motivating them to interaction, co-creation and collaboration. It was less successful at stimulating dialogue and reflection.

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