Into the wild - a field study on the evolutionary and ecological importance of thermal plasticity in ectotherms across temperate and tropical regions

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11 Citationer (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding how environmental factors affect the thermal tolerance of species is crucial for predicting the impact of thermal stress on species abundance and distribution. To date, species' responses to thermal stress are typically assessed on laboratory-reared individuals and using coarse, low-resolution, climate data that may not reflect microhabitat dynamics at a relevant scale. Here, we examine the daily temporal variation in heat tolerance in a range of species in their natural environments across temperate and tropical Australia. Individuals were collected in their habitats throughout the day and tested for heat tolerance immediately thereafter, while local microclimates were recorded at the collection sites. We found high levels of plasticity in heat tolerance across all the tested species. Both short- and long-term variability of temperature and humidity affected plastic adjustments of heat tolerance within and across days, but with species differences. Our results reveal that plastic changes in heat tolerance occur rapidly at a daily scale and that environmental factors on a relatively short timescale are important drivers of the observed variation in thermal tolerance. Ignoring such fine-scale physiological processes in distribution models might obscure conclusions about species' range shifts with global climate change. This article is part of the theme issue 'Species' ranges in the face of changing environments (part 1)'.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer20210004
TidsskriftPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Vol/bind377
Udgave nummer1846
ISSN0962-8436
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2022

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a grant from the Danish Council for Independent Research (grant no. DFF-8021-00014B) to T.N.K and an Australian Research Council Discovery grant no. 120100916 to A.A.H. Travel grants were provided to N.K.N. from Otto Mønsted Fond, Knud Højgaards Fond and the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. Acknowledgements

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s).

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