Joining the Debate: Creativity Seen from Eastern and Central Europe

Vlad Petre Glaveanu, Maciej Karwowski

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

5 Citationer (Scopus)

Resumé

This special issue, as seen from above, covers at least three important themes and showcases research from a series of different Eastern and Central European countries using a variety of methodologies, from surveys to psychobiography. It stands as a testimony for the growing interest in creativity in this part of the world and also for the valuable insights creativity research worldwide can take when focusing on this geo-cultural location. Studies of implicit theories and creativity enhancement programmes are not unique only to this context, however, the ways in which the authors approach them and the widespread concern for social and cultural variables sets these investigations apart at least from more mainstream, ‘Western’ psychology. A focus on culture is not gratuitous as many scholars today realise (Lubart, 1999; Simonton, 2003) and it is perhaps here where Eastern researchers have the greatest contribution to make. This is because Eastern and Central Europe is not only a place with a rich and diverse cultural heritage but also a space in which people understand the importance of living within a society and a culture and trying to preserve and transform them, ‘from within’, in ways that both reflect and support creative expression.
Preparation of this special issue was possible thanks to the warm reaction of James C. Kaufman and the whole editorial board. We would like to express our gratitude to all editorial board members who served as peer reviewers during the submission and review process as well as to several ad hoc reviewers who helped us and the authors improve their articles. The full list of reviewers is attached at the end of this issue. Finally we would like to thank the authors who responded to our call and invite readers to engage with these contributions and discover creativity as it is seen from Eastern and Central Europe.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe International Journal of Creativity & Problem Solving
Vol/bind23
Udgave nummer1
ISSN1225-3111
StatusUdgivet - 2013

Citer dette

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Joining the Debate : Creativity Seen from Eastern and Central Europe. / Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Karwowski , Maciej .

I: The International Journal of Creativity & Problem Solving, Bind 23, Nr. 1, 2013.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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