Making media technology our own by learning to fear them: Blind spots in the theory of domestication?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

Resumé

In the mid 2000’s the term ”Fear of Missing Out” emerged in the wake of the first user generation of Web 2.0. FOMO has been debated and researched from different perspectives. One of the first studies was made within market or business psychology (Andersen, 2013; Grohol, 2018). The claim of the study was that heavy interaction with sociale media or web 2.0 created an unfortunate socio-psychological tension in users, which literaly translated into an addicted-like behavior: The inability of users to let go of their favorite social media, the attempt to respond to all invitations and notifications resulting in an overwhelming overbooked daily calendar, and some physiological symptoms as well (Bruglass et al, 2017; Hunt et al, 2018). Other studies have indicated that FoMO most relevantly can be considered as part of an emerging normal mode of user interaction within a still converging and diverging social media environment (Andersen, 2013).
OriginalsprogDansk
TidsskriftNordicom Review
Antal sider2
ISSN1403-1108
StatusAfsendt - 1 okt. 2019

Emneord

  • media technology
  • FOMO
  • domistication
  • User studies
  • media sociology

Citer dette

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title = "Making media technology our own by learning to fear them: Blind spots in the theory of domestication?",
abstract = "In the mid 2000’s the term ”Fear of Missing Out” emerged in the wake of the first user generation of Web 2.0. FOMO has been debated and researched from different perspectives. One of the first studies was made within market or business psychology (Andersen, 2013; Grohol, 2018). The claim of the study was that heavy interaction with sociale media or web 2.0 created an unfortunate socio-psychological tension in users, which literaly translated into an addicted-like behavior: The inability of users to let go of their favorite social media, the attempt to respond to all invitations and notifications resulting in an overwhelming overbooked daily calendar, and some physiological symptoms as well (Bruglass et al, 2017; Hunt et al, 2018). Other studies have indicated that FoMO most relevantly can be considered as part of an emerging normal mode of user interaction within a still converging and diverging social media environment (Andersen, 2013).",
keywords = "media technology, FOMO, domistication, User studies, media sociology",
author = "Andersen, {Tem Frank} and Peter Vistisen",
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Making media technology our own by learning to fear them : Blind spots in the theory of domestication? / Andersen, Tem Frank; Vistisen, Peter.

I: Nordicom Review, 01.10.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Making media technology our own by learning to fear them

T2 - Blind spots in the theory of domestication?

AU - Andersen, Tem Frank

AU - Vistisen, Peter

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - In the mid 2000’s the term ”Fear of Missing Out” emerged in the wake of the first user generation of Web 2.0. FOMO has been debated and researched from different perspectives. One of the first studies was made within market or business psychology (Andersen, 2013; Grohol, 2018). The claim of the study was that heavy interaction with sociale media or web 2.0 created an unfortunate socio-psychological tension in users, which literaly translated into an addicted-like behavior: The inability of users to let go of their favorite social media, the attempt to respond to all invitations and notifications resulting in an overwhelming overbooked daily calendar, and some physiological symptoms as well (Bruglass et al, 2017; Hunt et al, 2018). Other studies have indicated that FoMO most relevantly can be considered as part of an emerging normal mode of user interaction within a still converging and diverging social media environment (Andersen, 2013).

AB - In the mid 2000’s the term ”Fear of Missing Out” emerged in the wake of the first user generation of Web 2.0. FOMO has been debated and researched from different perspectives. One of the first studies was made within market or business psychology (Andersen, 2013; Grohol, 2018). The claim of the study was that heavy interaction with sociale media or web 2.0 created an unfortunate socio-psychological tension in users, which literaly translated into an addicted-like behavior: The inability of users to let go of their favorite social media, the attempt to respond to all invitations and notifications resulting in an overwhelming overbooked daily calendar, and some physiological symptoms as well (Bruglass et al, 2017; Hunt et al, 2018). Other studies have indicated that FoMO most relevantly can be considered as part of an emerging normal mode of user interaction within a still converging and diverging social media environment (Andersen, 2013).

KW - media technology

KW - FOMO

KW - domistication

KW - User studies

KW - media sociology

UR - https://www.nordicom.gu.se/en/latest/news/call-papers-struggling-technology

M3 - Konferenceabstrakt i tidsskrift

JO - Nordicom Review

JF - Nordicom Review

SN - 1403-1108

ER -