Masculinities, postcolonialism and transnational memories of violent conflicts

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of combining the concept of hegemonic masculinity with a postcolonial perspective when analysing the identity formations of first and second-generation postcolonial migrants, whose gendered identities are formed by narratives of transnational memories of decolonization, war and violence. The results expand approaches to the analysis of masculinity, not only by combining masculinity with a postcolonial approach, but also by a methodological intervention into narratives of transnational memories. By including transnational and postcolonial perspectives, this study also contributes to calls to rethink masculinity from global, transnational and postcolonial perspectives (Connell, 2016; Messerschmitt, 2015; Hearn et al., 2014; Beasley, 2008). I illustrate the argument with examples of the identity formations of postcolonial migrants from Indonesia to the Netherlands and from narratives of transnational memories of events of mass violence and human rights abuses during the Indonesian war for independence from the colonial power of the Netherlands (1945–1949). I retrieve these examples by means of a biographical narrative analysis of the Dutch autobiographical and multimodal novel ‘The interpreter from Java’ by Alfred Birney (2016).
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNORMA: International Journal of Masculinity Studies
ISSN1890-2138
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 24 jan. 2019

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masculinity
narrative
identity formation
Netherlands
migrant
violence
colonial power
decolonization
interpreter
first generation
Indonesia
human rights
abuse
event

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    title = "Masculinities, postcolonialism and transnational memories of violent conflicts",
    abstract = "The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of combining the concept of hegemonic masculinity with a postcolonial perspective when analysing the identity formations of first and second-generation postcolonial migrants, whose gendered identities are formed by narratives of transnational memories of decolonization, war and violence. The results expand approaches to the analysis of masculinity, not only by combining masculinity with a postcolonial approach, but also by a methodological intervention into narratives of transnational memories. By including transnational and postcolonial perspectives, this study also contributes to calls to rethink masculinity from global, transnational and postcolonial perspectives (Connell, 2016; Messerschmitt, 2015; Hearn et al., 2014; Beasley, 2008). I illustrate the argument with examples of the identity formations of postcolonial migrants from Indonesia to the Netherlands and from narratives of transnational memories of events of mass violence and human rights abuses during the Indonesian war for independence from the colonial power of the Netherlands (1945–1949). I retrieve these examples by means of a biographical narrative analysis of the Dutch autobiographical and multimodal novel ‘The interpreter from Java’ by Alfred Birney (2016).",
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    Masculinities, postcolonialism and transnational memories of violent conflicts. / Stoltz, Pauline.

    I: NORMA: International Journal of Masculinity Studies, 24.01.2019.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Masculinities, postcolonialism and transnational memories of violent conflicts

    AU - Stoltz, Pauline

    PY - 2019/1/24

    Y1 - 2019/1/24

    N2 - The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of combining the concept of hegemonic masculinity with a postcolonial perspective when analysing the identity formations of first and second-generation postcolonial migrants, whose gendered identities are formed by narratives of transnational memories of decolonization, war and violence. The results expand approaches to the analysis of masculinity, not only by combining masculinity with a postcolonial approach, but also by a methodological intervention into narratives of transnational memories. By including transnational and postcolonial perspectives, this study also contributes to calls to rethink masculinity from global, transnational and postcolonial perspectives (Connell, 2016; Messerschmitt, 2015; Hearn et al., 2014; Beasley, 2008). I illustrate the argument with examples of the identity formations of postcolonial migrants from Indonesia to the Netherlands and from narratives of transnational memories of events of mass violence and human rights abuses during the Indonesian war for independence from the colonial power of the Netherlands (1945–1949). I retrieve these examples by means of a biographical narrative analysis of the Dutch autobiographical and multimodal novel ‘The interpreter from Java’ by Alfred Birney (2016).

    AB - The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of combining the concept of hegemonic masculinity with a postcolonial perspective when analysing the identity formations of first and second-generation postcolonial migrants, whose gendered identities are formed by narratives of transnational memories of decolonization, war and violence. The results expand approaches to the analysis of masculinity, not only by combining masculinity with a postcolonial approach, but also by a methodological intervention into narratives of transnational memories. By including transnational and postcolonial perspectives, this study also contributes to calls to rethink masculinity from global, transnational and postcolonial perspectives (Connell, 2016; Messerschmitt, 2015; Hearn et al., 2014; Beasley, 2008). I illustrate the argument with examples of the identity formations of postcolonial migrants from Indonesia to the Netherlands and from narratives of transnational memories of events of mass violence and human rights abuses during the Indonesian war for independence from the colonial power of the Netherlands (1945–1949). I retrieve these examples by means of a biographical narrative analysis of the Dutch autobiographical and multimodal novel ‘The interpreter from Java’ by Alfred Birney (2016).

    KW - Identity

    KW - postcolonialism

    KW - masculinities

    KW - intersectionality

    KW - memories

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