Neighbour and traffic noise annoyance: A nationwide study of associated mental health and perceived stress

Heidi AR Jensen, Birgit Rasmussen, Ola Ekholm

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

2 Citationer (Scopus)

Resumé

Background
Noise exposure is a well-known risk factor for multiple adverse health effects. Annoyance is the most prevalent response to environmental noise and may result in negative emotional responses, including poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between neighbour and traffic noise annoyance, and mental health and perceived stress.
Methods
Data were derived from the Danish Health and Morbidity surveys in 2010 and 2013. The study was based on a random sample of the adult population in Denmark living in multistorey housing (n = 7090). Information on neighbour and traffic noise annoyance during the past 2 weeks, and mental health and perceived stress, using Short Form-12 and Perceived Stress Scale instruments, respectively, was obtained by means of self-administered questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between noise annoyance and poor mental health, and high perceived stress levels, respectively.
Results
Those who reported being very annoyed by neighbour noise had 2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83–2.99] times higher odds of having poor mental health and 2.78 (95% CI: 2.25–3.43) times higher odds to experience a high level of perceived stress than individuals not annoyed by noise from neighbours. Similar associations were observed with traffic noise annoyance.
Conclusion
The results from this study indicate that there is a strong relationship between noise annoyance and poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress among individuals living in multistorey housing in Denmark. Future studies are needed to determine the direction of causality.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Public Health
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)1050-1055
Antal sider6
ISSN1101-1262
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 dec. 2018

Fingerprint

Noise
Mental Health
Denmark
Logistic Models
Confidence Intervals
Health Surveys
Causality
Morbidity
Health
Population

Citer dette

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title = "Neighbour and traffic noise annoyance: A nationwide study of associated mental health and perceived stress",
abstract = "BackgroundNoise exposure is a well-known risk factor for multiple adverse health effects. Annoyance is the most prevalent response to environmental noise and may result in negative emotional responses, including poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between neighbour and traffic noise annoyance, and mental health and perceived stress.MethodsData were derived from the Danish Health and Morbidity surveys in 2010 and 2013. The study was based on a random sample of the adult population in Denmark living in multistorey housing (n = 7090). Information on neighbour and traffic noise annoyance during the past 2 weeks, and mental health and perceived stress, using Short Form-12 and Perceived Stress Scale instruments, respectively, was obtained by means of self-administered questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between noise annoyance and poor mental health, and high perceived stress levels, respectively.ResultsThose who reported being very annoyed by neighbour noise had 2.34 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.83–2.99] times higher odds of having poor mental health and 2.78 (95{\%} CI: 2.25–3.43) times higher odds to experience a high level of perceived stress than individuals not annoyed by noise from neighbours. Similar associations were observed with traffic noise annoyance.ConclusionThe results from this study indicate that there is a strong relationship between noise annoyance and poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress among individuals living in multistorey housing in Denmark. Future studies are needed to determine the direction of causality.",
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Neighbour and traffic noise annoyance: A nationwide study of associated mental health and perceived stress. / Jensen, Heidi AR; Rasmussen, Birgit; Ekholm, Ola .

I: European Journal of Public Health, Bind 28, Nr. 6, 01.12.2018, s. 1050-1055.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neighbour and traffic noise annoyance: A nationwide study of associated mental health and perceived stress

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AU - Rasmussen, Birgit

AU - Ekholm, Ola

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Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - BackgroundNoise exposure is a well-known risk factor for multiple adverse health effects. Annoyance is the most prevalent response to environmental noise and may result in negative emotional responses, including poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between neighbour and traffic noise annoyance, and mental health and perceived stress.MethodsData were derived from the Danish Health and Morbidity surveys in 2010 and 2013. The study was based on a random sample of the adult population in Denmark living in multistorey housing (n = 7090). Information on neighbour and traffic noise annoyance during the past 2 weeks, and mental health and perceived stress, using Short Form-12 and Perceived Stress Scale instruments, respectively, was obtained by means of self-administered questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between noise annoyance and poor mental health, and high perceived stress levels, respectively.ResultsThose who reported being very annoyed by neighbour noise had 2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83–2.99] times higher odds of having poor mental health and 2.78 (95% CI: 2.25–3.43) times higher odds to experience a high level of perceived stress than individuals not annoyed by noise from neighbours. Similar associations were observed with traffic noise annoyance.ConclusionThe results from this study indicate that there is a strong relationship between noise annoyance and poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress among individuals living in multistorey housing in Denmark. Future studies are needed to determine the direction of causality.

AB - BackgroundNoise exposure is a well-known risk factor for multiple adverse health effects. Annoyance is the most prevalent response to environmental noise and may result in negative emotional responses, including poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between neighbour and traffic noise annoyance, and mental health and perceived stress.MethodsData were derived from the Danish Health and Morbidity surveys in 2010 and 2013. The study was based on a random sample of the adult population in Denmark living in multistorey housing (n = 7090). Information on neighbour and traffic noise annoyance during the past 2 weeks, and mental health and perceived stress, using Short Form-12 and Perceived Stress Scale instruments, respectively, was obtained by means of self-administered questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between noise annoyance and poor mental health, and high perceived stress levels, respectively.ResultsThose who reported being very annoyed by neighbour noise had 2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83–2.99] times higher odds of having poor mental health and 2.78 (95% CI: 2.25–3.43) times higher odds to experience a high level of perceived stress than individuals not annoyed by noise from neighbours. Similar associations were observed with traffic noise annoyance.ConclusionThe results from this study indicate that there is a strong relationship between noise annoyance and poor mental health and high levels of perceived stress among individuals living in multistorey housing in Denmark. Future studies are needed to determine the direction of causality.

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