Neighbour noise annoyance is associated with various mental and physical health symptoms: Results from a nationwide study among individuals living in multi-storey housing

Heidi AR Jensen, Birgit Rasmussen, Ola Ekholm*

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Background: Noise exposure is considered a stressor that may potentially exertnegative health effects among the exposed individuals. On a population basis, themost prevalent and immediate response to noise is annoyance, which is an individuallyexperienced phenomenon that may activate physiological stress-responses and resultin both physical and mental symptoms. Health implications of traffic noise have beeninvestigated thoroughly, but not of neighbour noise. The aim of the present study wasto examine the associations between neighbour noise annoyance and eight differentphysical and mental health symptoms.Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2017were used. The present study included a random sample of 3,893 adults living in multistoreyhousing. Information on neighbour noise annoyance and various healthsymptoms (e.g. pain in various body parts, headache, sleeping problems, depression,and anxiety) during the past two weeks was obtained by self-administeredquestionnaires. The question on neighbour noise annoyance and health symptoms,respectively, had three possible response options: ‘Yes, very annoyed/bothered’, ‘Yes,slightly annoyed/bothered’, ‘No’. The associations between neighbour noiseannoyance and very bothering physical and mental health symptoms were investigatedusing multiple logistic regression models.Results: Being very annoyed by neighbour noise was significantly associated withhigher odds of being very bothered by all eight health symptoms (adjusted OR=1.73-3.32, all p-values <0.05) compared to individuals not annoyed by noise fromneighbours. Statistically significant interactions were observed between sex and two ofthe eight health symptoms. Among women, a strong association was observedbetween neighbour noise annoyance and being very bothered by pain or discomfort inthe shoulder or neck, and in the arms, hands, legs, knees, hips or joints. Among men,no associations were observed.Conclusions: Based on the findings from this study, neighbour noise annoyance isstrongly associated with eight different physical and mental health symptoms. Futurestudies are encouraged to 1) determine the direction of causality using a longitudinaldesign, 2) explore the biological mechanisms explaining the sex-specific impact ofneighbour noise annoyance on symptoms of musculoskeletal pain or discomfort andthe other outcomes as well.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer1508
TidsskriftBMC Public Health
Vol/bind19
Sider (fra-til)1-10
Antal sider10
ISSN1471-2458
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 12 nov. 2019

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Noise
Mental Health
Health
Logistic Models
Pain
Musculoskeletal Pain
Physiological Stress
Hip Joint
Health Surveys
Human Body
Causality
Headache
Leg
Knee
Arm
Neck
Anxiety
Hand
Depression
Morbidity

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title = "Neighbour noise annoyance is associated with various mental and physical health symptoms: Results from a nationwide study among individuals living in multi-storey housing",
abstract = "Background: Noise exposure is considered a stressor that may potentially exertnegative health effects among the exposed individuals. On a population basis, themost prevalent and immediate response to noise is annoyance, which is an individuallyexperienced phenomenon that may activate physiological stress-responses and resultin both physical and mental symptoms. Health implications of traffic noise have beeninvestigated thoroughly, but not of neighbour noise. The aim of the present study wasto examine the associations between neighbour noise annoyance and eight differentphysical and mental health symptoms.Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2017were used. The present study included a random sample of 3,893 adults living in multistoreyhousing. Information on neighbour noise annoyance and various healthsymptoms (e.g. pain in various body parts, headache, sleeping problems, depression,and anxiety) during the past two weeks was obtained by self-administeredquestionnaires. The question on neighbour noise annoyance and health symptoms,respectively, had three possible response options: ‘Yes, very annoyed/bothered’, ‘Yes,slightly annoyed/bothered’, ‘No’. The associations between neighbour noiseannoyance and very bothering physical and mental health symptoms were investigatedusing multiple logistic regression models.Results: Being very annoyed by neighbour noise was significantly associated withhigher odds of being very bothered by all eight health symptoms (adjusted OR=1.73-3.32, all p-values <0.05) compared to individuals not annoyed by noise fromneighbours. Statistically significant interactions were observed between sex and two ofthe eight health symptoms. Among women, a strong association was observedbetween neighbour noise annoyance and being very bothered by pain or discomfort inthe shoulder or neck, and in the arms, hands, legs, knees, hips or joints. Among men,no associations were observed.Conclusions: Based on the findings from this study, neighbour noise annoyance isstrongly associated with eight different physical and mental health symptoms. Futurestudies are encouraged to 1) determine the direction of causality using a longitudinaldesign, 2) explore the biological mechanisms explaining the sex-specific impact ofneighbour noise annoyance on symptoms of musculoskeletal pain or discomfort andthe other outcomes as well.",
keywords = "neighbour noise, noise annoyance, housing",
author = "Jensen, {Heidi AR} and Birgit Rasmussen and Ola Ekholm",
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Neighbour noise annoyance is associated with various mental and physical health symptoms : Results from a nationwide study among individuals living in multi-storey housing. / Jensen, Heidi AR; Rasmussen, Birgit; Ekholm, Ola .

I: BMC Public Health, Bind 19, 1508, 12.11.2019, s. 1-10.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neighbour noise annoyance is associated with various mental and physical health symptoms

T2 - Results from a nationwide study among individuals living in multi-storey housing

AU - Jensen, Heidi AR

AU - Rasmussen, Birgit

AU - Ekholm, Ola

PY - 2019/11/12

Y1 - 2019/11/12

N2 - Background: Noise exposure is considered a stressor that may potentially exertnegative health effects among the exposed individuals. On a population basis, themost prevalent and immediate response to noise is annoyance, which is an individuallyexperienced phenomenon that may activate physiological stress-responses and resultin both physical and mental symptoms. Health implications of traffic noise have beeninvestigated thoroughly, but not of neighbour noise. The aim of the present study wasto examine the associations between neighbour noise annoyance and eight differentphysical and mental health symptoms.Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2017were used. The present study included a random sample of 3,893 adults living in multistoreyhousing. Information on neighbour noise annoyance and various healthsymptoms (e.g. pain in various body parts, headache, sleeping problems, depression,and anxiety) during the past two weeks was obtained by self-administeredquestionnaires. The question on neighbour noise annoyance and health symptoms,respectively, had three possible response options: ‘Yes, very annoyed/bothered’, ‘Yes,slightly annoyed/bothered’, ‘No’. The associations between neighbour noiseannoyance and very bothering physical and mental health symptoms were investigatedusing multiple logistic regression models.Results: Being very annoyed by neighbour noise was significantly associated withhigher odds of being very bothered by all eight health symptoms (adjusted OR=1.73-3.32, all p-values <0.05) compared to individuals not annoyed by noise fromneighbours. Statistically significant interactions were observed between sex and two ofthe eight health symptoms. Among women, a strong association was observedbetween neighbour noise annoyance and being very bothered by pain or discomfort inthe shoulder or neck, and in the arms, hands, legs, knees, hips or joints. Among men,no associations were observed.Conclusions: Based on the findings from this study, neighbour noise annoyance isstrongly associated with eight different physical and mental health symptoms. Futurestudies are encouraged to 1) determine the direction of causality using a longitudinaldesign, 2) explore the biological mechanisms explaining the sex-specific impact ofneighbour noise annoyance on symptoms of musculoskeletal pain or discomfort andthe other outcomes as well.

AB - Background: Noise exposure is considered a stressor that may potentially exertnegative health effects among the exposed individuals. On a population basis, themost prevalent and immediate response to noise is annoyance, which is an individuallyexperienced phenomenon that may activate physiological stress-responses and resultin both physical and mental symptoms. Health implications of traffic noise have beeninvestigated thoroughly, but not of neighbour noise. The aim of the present study wasto examine the associations between neighbour noise annoyance and eight differentphysical and mental health symptoms.Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2017were used. The present study included a random sample of 3,893 adults living in multistoreyhousing. Information on neighbour noise annoyance and various healthsymptoms (e.g. pain in various body parts, headache, sleeping problems, depression,and anxiety) during the past two weeks was obtained by self-administeredquestionnaires. The question on neighbour noise annoyance and health symptoms,respectively, had three possible response options: ‘Yes, very annoyed/bothered’, ‘Yes,slightly annoyed/bothered’, ‘No’. The associations between neighbour noiseannoyance and very bothering physical and mental health symptoms were investigatedusing multiple logistic regression models.Results: Being very annoyed by neighbour noise was significantly associated withhigher odds of being very bothered by all eight health symptoms (adjusted OR=1.73-3.32, all p-values <0.05) compared to individuals not annoyed by noise fromneighbours. Statistically significant interactions were observed between sex and two ofthe eight health symptoms. Among women, a strong association was observedbetween neighbour noise annoyance and being very bothered by pain or discomfort inthe shoulder or neck, and in the arms, hands, legs, knees, hips or joints. Among men,no associations were observed.Conclusions: Based on the findings from this study, neighbour noise annoyance isstrongly associated with eight different physical and mental health symptoms. Futurestudies are encouraged to 1) determine the direction of causality using a longitudinaldesign, 2) explore the biological mechanisms explaining the sex-specific impact ofneighbour noise annoyance on symptoms of musculoskeletal pain or discomfort andthe other outcomes as well.

KW - neighbour noise

KW - noise annoyance

KW - housing

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-019-7893-8

DO - 10.1186/s12889-019-7893-8

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - B M C Public Health

JF - B M C Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

M1 - 1508

ER -