Pain-Induced Reduction in Corticomotor Excitability is Counteracted by Combined Action-Observation and Motor Imagery

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Resumé

Musculoskeletal pain reduces corticomotor excitability (CE) and methods modulating such CE reduction remain elusive. This study aimed to modulate pain-induced CE reduction by performing action observation and motor imagery (AOMI) during experimental muscle pain. Twelve healthy participants participated in 3 cross-over and randomized sessions separated by 1 week. During the AOMI session subjects performed an AOMI task for 10 minutes. In the AOMI+PAIN session, hypertonic saline was injected in the first dorsal interosseous muscle before performing the AOMI task. In the PAIN session, participants remained at rest for 10 minutes or until pain-resolve after the hypertonic saline injection. CE was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation motor-evoked potentials (TMS-MEPs) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle at baseline, during, immediately after, and 10 minutes after AOMI and/or PAIN. Facilitated TMS-MEPs were found after 2 and 4 minutes of AOMI performance (P < .017) whereas a reduction in TMS-MEPs occurred at 4 minutes (P < .017) during the PAIN session. Performing the AOMI task during pain counteracted the reduction in CE, as evident by no change in TMS-MEPs during the AOMI+PAIN session (P > .017). Pain intensity was similar between the AOMI+PAIN and PAIN sessions (P = .71). This study, which may be considered a pilot, demonstrated the counteracting effects of AOMI on pain-induced decreases in CE and warrants further studies in a larger population. Perspective: This is the first study to demonstrate a method counteracting the reduction in CE associated with acute pain and advances therapeutic possibilities for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Pain
Antal sider30
ISSN1526-5900
DOI
StatusAccepteret/In press - 2 maj 2019

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Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Observation
Pain
Musculoskeletal Pain
Motor Evoked Potentials
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Muscles
Myalgia
Acute Pain
Chronic Pain
Healthy Volunteers
Injections

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    title = "Pain-Induced Reduction in Corticomotor Excitability is Counteracted by Combined Action-Observation and Motor Imagery",
    abstract = "Musculoskeletal pain reduces corticomotor excitability (CE) and methods modulating such CE reduction remain elusive. This study aimed to modulate pain-induced CE reduction by performing action observation and motor imagery (AOMI) during experimental muscle pain. Twelve healthy participants participated in 3 cross-over and randomized sessions separated by 1 week. During the AOMI session subjects performed an AOMI task for 10 minutes. In the AOMI+PAIN session, hypertonic saline was injected in the first dorsal interosseous muscle before performing the AOMI task. In the PAIN session, participants remained at rest for 10 minutes or until pain-resolve after the hypertonic saline injection. CE was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation motor-evoked potentials (TMS-MEPs) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle at baseline, during, immediately after, and 10 minutes after AOMI and/or PAIN. Facilitated TMS-MEPs were found after 2 and 4 minutes of AOMI performance (P < .017) whereas a reduction in TMS-MEPs occurred at 4 minutes (P < .017) during the PAIN session. Performing the AOMI task during pain counteracted the reduction in CE, as evident by no change in TMS-MEPs during the AOMI+PAIN session (P > .017). Pain intensity was similar between the AOMI+PAIN and PAIN sessions (P = .71). This study, which may be considered a pilot, demonstrated the counteracting effects of AOMI on pain-induced decreases in CE and warrants further studies in a larger population. Perspective: This is the first study to demonstrate a method counteracting the reduction in CE associated with acute pain and advances therapeutic possibilities for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain.",
    keywords = "Corticospinal excitability, action observation, experimental muscle pain, mirror neuron system, motor imagery",
    author = "Larsen, {Dennis Boye} and Thomas Graven-Nielsen and Shellie Boudreau",
    year = "2019",
    month = "5",
    day = "2",
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    T1 - Pain-Induced Reduction in Corticomotor Excitability is Counteracted by Combined Action-Observation and Motor Imagery

    AU - Larsen, Dennis Boye

    AU - Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    AU - Boudreau, Shellie

    PY - 2019/5/2

    Y1 - 2019/5/2

    N2 - Musculoskeletal pain reduces corticomotor excitability (CE) and methods modulating such CE reduction remain elusive. This study aimed to modulate pain-induced CE reduction by performing action observation and motor imagery (AOMI) during experimental muscle pain. Twelve healthy participants participated in 3 cross-over and randomized sessions separated by 1 week. During the AOMI session subjects performed an AOMI task for 10 minutes. In the AOMI+PAIN session, hypertonic saline was injected in the first dorsal interosseous muscle before performing the AOMI task. In the PAIN session, participants remained at rest for 10 minutes or until pain-resolve after the hypertonic saline injection. CE was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation motor-evoked potentials (TMS-MEPs) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle at baseline, during, immediately after, and 10 minutes after AOMI and/or PAIN. Facilitated TMS-MEPs were found after 2 and 4 minutes of AOMI performance (P < .017) whereas a reduction in TMS-MEPs occurred at 4 minutes (P < .017) during the PAIN session. Performing the AOMI task during pain counteracted the reduction in CE, as evident by no change in TMS-MEPs during the AOMI+PAIN session (P > .017). Pain intensity was similar between the AOMI+PAIN and PAIN sessions (P = .71). This study, which may be considered a pilot, demonstrated the counteracting effects of AOMI on pain-induced decreases in CE and warrants further studies in a larger population. Perspective: This is the first study to demonstrate a method counteracting the reduction in CE associated with acute pain and advances therapeutic possibilities for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    AB - Musculoskeletal pain reduces corticomotor excitability (CE) and methods modulating such CE reduction remain elusive. This study aimed to modulate pain-induced CE reduction by performing action observation and motor imagery (AOMI) during experimental muscle pain. Twelve healthy participants participated in 3 cross-over and randomized sessions separated by 1 week. During the AOMI session subjects performed an AOMI task for 10 minutes. In the AOMI+PAIN session, hypertonic saline was injected in the first dorsal interosseous muscle before performing the AOMI task. In the PAIN session, participants remained at rest for 10 minutes or until pain-resolve after the hypertonic saline injection. CE was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation motor-evoked potentials (TMS-MEPs) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle at baseline, during, immediately after, and 10 minutes after AOMI and/or PAIN. Facilitated TMS-MEPs were found after 2 and 4 minutes of AOMI performance (P < .017) whereas a reduction in TMS-MEPs occurred at 4 minutes (P < .017) during the PAIN session. Performing the AOMI task during pain counteracted the reduction in CE, as evident by no change in TMS-MEPs during the AOMI+PAIN session (P > .017). Pain intensity was similar between the AOMI+PAIN and PAIN sessions (P = .71). This study, which may be considered a pilot, demonstrated the counteracting effects of AOMI on pain-induced decreases in CE and warrants further studies in a larger population. Perspective: This is the first study to demonstrate a method counteracting the reduction in CE associated with acute pain and advances therapeutic possibilities for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    KW - Corticospinal excitability

    KW - action observation

    KW - experimental muscle pain

    KW - mirror neuron system

    KW - motor imagery

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    U2 - 10.1016/j.jpain.2019.05.001

    DO - 10.1016/j.jpain.2019.05.001

    M3 - Journal article

    JO - Journal of Pain

    JF - Journal of Pain

    SN - 1526-5900

    ER -