Photodegradation of three stormwater biocides

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3 Citationer (Scopus)

Resumé

Photodegradation of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions under UV light and under natural sunlight. Demineralized water and two different waters from stormwater retention ponds were used. An observed decline in biocide concentration was related to the accumulated light energy during the degradation time. Diuron and terbutryn were degradable under UV light following 1st order degradation kinetics, while no significant decrease of carbendazim was observed throughout the duration of experiments. Photodegradation of diuron and terbutryn was slightly faster in demineralized water compared with pond water. The outdoors experiments showed limited degradation of the compounds for the duration of the test (8–17 days). The results emphasize the importance of water type, the wavelength and energy of the light when investigating pollutant’s photo fate. Also, this study indicates that photodegradation is not a major process contributing to the removal of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn in stormwater retention ponds.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftUrban Water Journal
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)53-60
Antal sider8
ISSN1573-062X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

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photodegradation
diuron
stormwater
carbendazim
pesticide
water
pond
degradation
energy
experiment
pollutant
wavelength
kinetics

Emneord

  • Photodegradation
  • Biocides
  • Stormwater retention ponds

Citer dette

@article{c7a46fd38b11403099ee78c9279358da,
title = "Photodegradation of three stormwater biocides",
abstract = "Photodegradation of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions under UV light and under natural sunlight. Demineralized water and two different waters from stormwater retention ponds were used. An observed decline in biocide concentration was related to the accumulated light energy during the degradation time. Diuron and terbutryn were degradable under UV light following 1st order degradation kinetics, while no significant decrease of carbendazim was observed throughout the duration of experiments. Photodegradation of diuron and terbutryn was slightly faster in demineralized water compared with pond water. The outdoors experiments showed limited degradation of the compounds for the duration of the test (8–17 days). The results emphasize the importance of water type, the wavelength and energy of the light when investigating pollutant’s photo fate. Also, this study indicates that photodegradation is not a major process contributing to the removal of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn in stormwater retention ponds.",
keywords = "Photodegradation, Biocides, Stormwater retention ponds, Photodegradation, Biocides, Stormwater retention ponds",
author = "Greta Minelgaite and Nielsen, {Asbj{\o}rn Haaning} and Pedersen, {Morten Lauge} and Jes Vollertsen",
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doi = "10.1080/1573062X.2015.1076489",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "53--60",
journal = "Urban Water Journal",
issn = "1573-062X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
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}

Photodegradation of three stormwater biocides. / Minelgaite, Greta; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Vollertsen, Jes.

I: Urban Water Journal, Bind 14, Nr. 1, 2017, s. 53-60.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Photodegradation of three stormwater biocides

AU - Minelgaite, Greta

AU - Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

AU - Pedersen, Morten Lauge

AU - Vollertsen, Jes

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Photodegradation of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions under UV light and under natural sunlight. Demineralized water and two different waters from stormwater retention ponds were used. An observed decline in biocide concentration was related to the accumulated light energy during the degradation time. Diuron and terbutryn were degradable under UV light following 1st order degradation kinetics, while no significant decrease of carbendazim was observed throughout the duration of experiments. Photodegradation of diuron and terbutryn was slightly faster in demineralized water compared with pond water. The outdoors experiments showed limited degradation of the compounds for the duration of the test (8–17 days). The results emphasize the importance of water type, the wavelength and energy of the light when investigating pollutant’s photo fate. Also, this study indicates that photodegradation is not a major process contributing to the removal of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn in stormwater retention ponds.

AB - Photodegradation of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions under UV light and under natural sunlight. Demineralized water and two different waters from stormwater retention ponds were used. An observed decline in biocide concentration was related to the accumulated light energy during the degradation time. Diuron and terbutryn were degradable under UV light following 1st order degradation kinetics, while no significant decrease of carbendazim was observed throughout the duration of experiments. Photodegradation of diuron and terbutryn was slightly faster in demineralized water compared with pond water. The outdoors experiments showed limited degradation of the compounds for the duration of the test (8–17 days). The results emphasize the importance of water type, the wavelength and energy of the light when investigating pollutant’s photo fate. Also, this study indicates that photodegradation is not a major process contributing to the removal of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn in stormwater retention ponds.

KW - Photodegradation

KW - Biocides

KW - Stormwater retention ponds

KW - Photodegradation

KW - Biocides

KW - Stormwater retention ponds

U2 - 10.1080/1573062X.2015.1076489

DO - 10.1080/1573062X.2015.1076489

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 53

EP - 60

JO - Urban Water Journal

JF - Urban Water Journal

SN - 1573-062X

IS - 1

ER -