Playing it Real: Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space

Jens Grubert, Ann Morrison, Helmut Munz, Gerhard Reitmayr

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

14 Citationer (Scopus)
282 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Magic lens and static peephole interfaces are used in numerous consumer mobile phone applications such as Augmented Reality browsers, games or digital map applications in a variety of contexts including public spaces. Interface performance has been evaluated for various interaction tasks involving spatial relationships in a scene. However, interface usage outside laboratory conditions has not been considered in depth in the evaluation of these interfaces.
We present findings about the usage of magic lens and static peephole interfaces for playing a find-and-select game in a public space and report on the reactions of the public audience to participants’ interactions.
Contrary to our expectations participants favored the magic lens over a static peephole interface despite tracking errors, fatigue and potentially conspicuous gestures. Most passersby did not pay attention to the participants and vice versa. A comparative laboratory experiment revealed only few differences in system usage.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelMobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services
Antal sider10
Udgivelses stedNew York, NY, USA
ForlagAssociation for Computing Machinery
Publikationsdatosep. 2012
Sider231-240
ISBN (Trykt)978-1-4503-1105-2
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2012
BegivenhedMobileHCI2012 - San Francisco, USA
Varighed: 21 sep. 201224 sep. 2012

Konference

KonferenceMobileHCI2012
LandUSA
BySan Francisco
Periode21/09/201224/09/2012

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Lenses
Augmented reality
Mobile phones
Fatigue of materials
Experiments

Citer dette

Grubert, J., Morrison, A., Munz, H., & Reitmayr, G. (2012). Playing it Real: Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space. I MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services (s. 231-240 ). New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2371574.2371609
Grubert, Jens ; Morrison, Ann ; Munz, Helmut ; Reitmayr, Gerhard . / Playing it Real : Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space. MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services. New York, NY, USA : Association for Computing Machinery, 2012. s. 231-240
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Grubert, J, Morrison, A, Munz, H & Reitmayr, G 2012, Playing it Real: Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space. i MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services. Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, s. 231-240 , MobileHCI2012, San Francisco, USA, 21/09/2012. https://doi.org/10.1145/2371574.2371609

Playing it Real : Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space. / Grubert, Jens ; Morrison, Ann; Munz, Helmut; Reitmayr, Gerhard .

MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services. New York, NY, USA : Association for Computing Machinery, 2012. s. 231-240 .

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

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Grubert J, Morrison A, Munz H, Reitmayr G. Playing it Real: Magic Lens and Static Peephole Interfaces for Games in a Public Space. I MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 14th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services. New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery. 2012. s. 231-240 https://doi.org/10.1145/2371574.2371609