QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting

Jeni Paay, Jesper Kjeldskov, Umachanger Brinthaparan, Lars Lichon, Stephan Rasmussen, Nirojan Srikandarajah

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

Resumé

Smoking cigarettes is a serious health risk and people who wish to quit often struggle to do so. Finding ways to help people quit smoking is a high priority in health behavior change research, because smoking related illness has an immense economic impact on society, and social impact on friends, families, and the individuals suffering and dying from smoking. Reports show that in Australia, an estimated 15 thousand people die from smoking related illness each year, costing over $31.5 billion (Australian Government Department of Health, 2015). The picture world-wide is even more dire (World Health Organisation, 2017). Face-to-face counselling is the most effective method of assisting smoking cessation, but for various reasons, people do not seek it (Smith et al., 2015). In this study, we specifically look at how everyday technologies, such as smartphones, can increase the efficacy of health behavior change interventions through designing for flexibility and individual differences. In a user-centred approach we explored why smokers continue to smoke, or fail at quitting (Paay et al., 2015a). We used this knowledge to create the QuittyAct framework, for informing the design of health technologies that support people quitting. A prototype mobile application, QuittyLink, was created to go beyond providing information on health implications of smoking toward actively supporting individual smokers in the serious challenges that they face when trying to quit (Paay et al., 2015b).
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelProceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017
ForlagSheffield Hallam University
Publikationsdato4 jun. 2018
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-0-6480892-1-6
StatusUdgivet - 4 jun. 2018
BegivenhedDesign4Health - Melbourne, Melbourne, Australien
Varighed: 4 dec. 20157 jan. 2018
http://www.design4health.org.uk/publications

Konference

KonferenceDesign4Health
LokationMelbourne
LandAustralien
ByMelbourne
Periode04/12/201507/01/2018
Internetadresse

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Health
Health risks
Smartphones
Smoke
Economics

Citer dette

Paay, J., Kjeldskov, J., Brinthaparan, U., Lichon, L., Rasmussen, S., & Srikandarajah, N. (2018). QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting. I Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017 Sheffield Hallam University.
Paay, Jeni ; Kjeldskov, Jesper ; Brinthaparan, Umachanger ; Lichon, Lars ; Rasmussen, Stephan ; Srikandarajah, Nirojan. / QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017. Sheffield Hallam University, 2018.
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title = "QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting",
abstract = "Smoking cigarettes is a serious health risk and people who wish to quit often struggle to do so. Finding ways to help people quit smoking is a high priority in health behavior change research, because smoking related illness has an immense economic impact on society, and social impact on friends, families, and the individuals suffering and dying from smoking. Reports show that in Australia, an estimated 15 thousand people die from smoking related illness each year, costing over $31.5 billion (Australian Government Department of Health, 2015). The picture world-wide is even more dire (World Health Organisation, 2017). Face-to-face counselling is the most effective method of assisting smoking cessation, but for various reasons, people do not seek it (Smith et al., 2015). In this study, we specifically look at how everyday technologies, such as smartphones, can increase the efficacy of health behavior change interventions through designing for flexibility and individual differences. In a user-centred approach we explored why smokers continue to smoke, or fail at quitting (Paay et al., 2015a). We used this knowledge to create the QuittyAct framework, for informing the design of health technologies that support people quitting. A prototype mobile application, QuittyLink, was created to go beyond providing information on health implications of smoking toward actively supporting individual smokers in the serious challenges that they face when trying to quit (Paay et al., 2015b).",
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Paay, J, Kjeldskov, J, Brinthaparan, U, Lichon, L, Rasmussen, S & Srikandarajah, N 2018, QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting. i Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017. Sheffield Hallam University, Design4Health, Melbourne, Australien, 04/12/2015.

QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting. / Paay, Jeni; Kjeldskov, Jesper; Brinthaparan, Umachanger; Lichon, Lars; Rasmussen, Stephan; Srikandarajah, Nirojan.

Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017. Sheffield Hallam University, 2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

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Paay J, Kjeldskov J, Brinthaparan U, Lichon L, Rasmussen S, Srikandarajah N. QuittyLink: Involving Smokers in the Design of Technology that Supports Individuals in Quitting. I Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Design4Health 2017. Sheffield Hallam University. 2018