Short-term memory capacity is dependent on perceived complexity, and not visual complexity per se

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Visual complexity of an object can vary in different degrees, and if we have a limited short-term memory capacity (e.g. Cowan, 2001), how does memory deal with objects of high visual complexity? While early studies demonstrated that visual complexity increase the load on both processing time and memory capacity (Alvarez & Cavanagh 2004), later studies indicate that memory capacity is highly influenced by stimulus specific expertise (Sørensen, & Kyllingsbæk, 2012). Nevertheless, complexity can be divided into two types based on either visual elements or familiarity. The current aim is to examine the relationship between the visual complexity and what we term the perceived complexity. In an experiment we used Chinese characters (radicals) divided into four groups based on visual complexity or stroke count (high vs low) and perceived complexity or word frequency (high vs low). We examined this using a whole report paradigm (Sperling, 1960) with varying exposure rates and modeled the results according to the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990). This procedure allows us to isolate specific attentional components and the results reveal that for experienced observers differences in processing speed and memory capacity is driven solely by the perceived complexity of an object.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato14 jun. 2019
StatusUdgivet - 14 jun. 2019
BegivenhedAnnual OAK Meeting - Merete Barker Auditorium (Building 1253, Room 211) Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C , Aarhus, Danmark
Varighed: 14 jun. 201914 jun. 2019
Konferencens nummer: 18
https://mindlab.au.dk/menu196-da

Konference

KonferenceAnnual OAK Meeting
Nummer18
LokationMerete Barker Auditorium (Building 1253, Room 211) Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C
LandDanmark
ByAarhus
Periode14/06/201914/06/2019
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Short-term memory capacity is dependent on perceived complexity, and not visual complexity per se. / Dall, Jonas Olsen; Sørensen, Thomas Alrik.

2019. Abstract fra Annual OAK Meeting, Aarhus, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Short-term memory capacity is dependent on perceived complexity, and not visual complexity per se

AU - Dall, Jonas Olsen

AU - Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

PY - 2019/6/14

Y1 - 2019/6/14

N2 - Visual complexity of an object can vary in different degrees, and if we have a limited short-term memory capacity (e.g. Cowan, 2001), how does memory deal with objects of high visual complexity? While early studies demonstrated that visual complexity increase the load on both processing time and memory capacity (Alvarez & Cavanagh 2004), later studies indicate that memory capacity is highly influenced by stimulus specific expertise (Sørensen, & Kyllingsbæk, 2012). Nevertheless, complexity can be divided into two types based on either visual elements or familiarity. The current aim is to examine the relationship between the visual complexity and what we term the perceived complexity. In an experiment we used Chinese characters (radicals) divided into four groups based on visual complexity or stroke count (high vs low) and perceived complexity or word frequency (high vs low). We examined this using a whole report paradigm (Sperling, 1960) with varying exposure rates and modeled the results according to the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990). This procedure allows us to isolate specific attentional components and the results reveal that for experienced observers differences in processing speed and memory capacity is driven solely by the perceived complexity of an object.

AB - Visual complexity of an object can vary in different degrees, and if we have a limited short-term memory capacity (e.g. Cowan, 2001), how does memory deal with objects of high visual complexity? While early studies demonstrated that visual complexity increase the load on both processing time and memory capacity (Alvarez & Cavanagh 2004), later studies indicate that memory capacity is highly influenced by stimulus specific expertise (Sørensen, & Kyllingsbæk, 2012). Nevertheless, complexity can be divided into two types based on either visual elements or familiarity. The current aim is to examine the relationship between the visual complexity and what we term the perceived complexity. In an experiment we used Chinese characters (radicals) divided into four groups based on visual complexity or stroke count (high vs low) and perceived complexity or word frequency (high vs low). We examined this using a whole report paradigm (Sperling, 1960) with varying exposure rates and modeled the results according to the Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990). This procedure allows us to isolate specific attentional components and the results reveal that for experienced observers differences in processing speed and memory capacity is driven solely by the perceived complexity of an object.

KW - Expertise

KW - Working Memory

KW - Attention

KW - Short-Term Memory Capacity

KW - Complexity

UR - http://cfin.au.dk/oak-2019/program/

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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