Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment: A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease?

Lars Brorson Fich, Mattias Wallergård, Åse Marie Hansen, Peter Jönsson

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

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Resumé

Due to the aging society, dementia is one of the major challenges to the health care systems all over the world. The growing number of patients, the long process and intensive need for care, especially in the later stages of the disease, make the growth in human as well as socioeconomic costs huge. The development of design strategies for nursing homes and other health care facilities such as day care centers addressing the needs of dementia patients is therefore very important. The vast majority of dementia cases is Alzheimer’s Disease, representing approximately 70% of all cases. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that starts in the hippocampus structure in the brain’s limbic system. The hippocampus has three interconnected functions; it holds the cognitive
map we use for way-finding, it creates new memories and it forms part of the feedback mechanism that controls the stress hormone cortisol. In the early stages of the disease, the impairment of way-finding and memory is particularly evident. These symptoms are therefore most often prioritized in design proposals and guidelines for AD patients. However, in this paper we argue that perhaps the most important impairment to address is the weakening of the hippocampus’ function in the stress system, as the lack of control of cortisol levels during stress can lead to further degradation of the hippocampus. We refer to a stress experiment suggesting that is possible through the built environment to influence the release of cortisol during stress. This again suggests that the design of e.g. nursing homes can contribute to a slower development of AD in its early stages
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelARCH 17 : 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings
RedaktørerNanet Mathiasen, Anne Kathrine Frandsen
Udgivelses stedCopenhagen
ForlagPolyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag
Publikationsdato2017
Sider150-162
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-87-93585-00-3
StatusUdgivet - 2017
BegivenhedInternational Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health - Aalborg Universitet, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, København, Danmark
Varighed: 26 apr. 201727 apr. 2017
Konferencens nummer: 3
http://www.arch17.aau.dk
http://www.arch17.aau.dk/

Konference

KonferenceInternational Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health
Nummer3
LokationAalborg Universitet, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15
LandDanmark
ByKøbenhavn
Periode26/04/201727/04/2017
Internetadresse

Fingeraftryk

Hippocampus
Alzheimer Disease
Hormones
Dementia
Hydrocortisone
Nursing Homes
Limbic System
Health Facilities
Critical Care
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Brain
Growth

Emneord

    Citer dette

    Fich, L. B., Wallergård, M., Hansen, Å. M., & Jönsson, P. (2017). Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment: A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease? I N. Mathiasen, & A. K. Frandsen (red.), ARCH 17: 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings (s. 150-162). Copenhagen: Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag.
    Fich, Lars Brorson ; Wallergård, Mattias ; Hansen, Åse Marie ; Jönsson, Peter. / Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment : A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease?. ARCH 17: 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings. red. / Nanet Mathiasen ; Anne Kathrine Frandsen. Copenhagen : Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, 2017. s. 150-162
    @inproceedings{3c777f212db847f8a447cbcd43b25583,
    title = "Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment: A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease?",
    abstract = "Due to the aging society, dementia is one of the major challenges to the health care systems all over the world. The growing number of patients, the long process and intensive need for care, especially in the later stages of the disease, make the growth in human as well as socioeconomic costs huge. The development of design strategies for nursing homes and other health care facilities such as day care centers addressing the needs of dementia patients is therefore very important. The vast majority of dementia cases is Alzheimer’s Disease, representing approximately 70{\%} of all cases. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that starts in the hippocampus structure in the brain’s limbic system. The hippocampus has three interconnected functions; it holds the cognitive map we use for way-finding, it creates new memories and it forms part of the feedback mechanism that controls the stress hormone cortisol. In the early stages of the disease, the impairment of way-finding and memory is particularly evident. These symptoms are therefore most often prioritized in design proposals and guidelines for AD patients. However, in this paper we argue that perhaps the most important impairment to address is the weakening of the hippocampus’ function in the stress system, as the lack of control of cortisol levels during stress can lead to further degradation of the hippocampus. We refer to a stress experiment suggesting that is possible through the built environment to influence the release of cortisol during stress. This again suggests that the design of e.g. nursing homes can contribute to a slower development of AD in its early stages",
    keywords = "Stress , cortisol, architecture, The Built Environment, Alzheimer Disease",
    author = "Fich, {Lars Brorson} and Mattias Wallerg{\aa}rd and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie} and Peter J{\"o}nsson",
    year = "2017",
    language = "English",
    pages = "150--162",
    editor = "Nanet Mathiasen and Frandsen, {Anne Kathrine}",
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    Fich, LB, Wallergård, M, Hansen, ÅM & Jönsson, P 2017, Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment: A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease? i N Mathiasen & AK Frandsen (red), ARCH 17: 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings. Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, Copenhagen, s. 150-162, International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health, København, Danmark, 26/04/2017.

    Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment : A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease? / Fich, Lars Brorson; Wallergård, Mattias; Hansen, Åse Marie; Jönsson, Peter.

    ARCH 17: 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings. red. / Nanet Mathiasen; Anne Kathrine Frandsen. Copenhagen : Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, 2017. s. 150-162.

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingKonferenceartikel i proceedingForskningpeer review

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment

    T2 - A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease?

    AU - Fich, Lars Brorson

    AU - Wallergård, Mattias

    AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

    AU - Jönsson, Peter

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    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Due to the aging society, dementia is one of the major challenges to the health care systems all over the world. The growing number of patients, the long process and intensive need for care, especially in the later stages of the disease, make the growth in human as well as socioeconomic costs huge. The development of design strategies for nursing homes and other health care facilities such as day care centers addressing the needs of dementia patients is therefore very important. The vast majority of dementia cases is Alzheimer’s Disease, representing approximately 70% of all cases. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that starts in the hippocampus structure in the brain’s limbic system. The hippocampus has three interconnected functions; it holds the cognitive map we use for way-finding, it creates new memories and it forms part of the feedback mechanism that controls the stress hormone cortisol. In the early stages of the disease, the impairment of way-finding and memory is particularly evident. These symptoms are therefore most often prioritized in design proposals and guidelines for AD patients. However, in this paper we argue that perhaps the most important impairment to address is the weakening of the hippocampus’ function in the stress system, as the lack of control of cortisol levels during stress can lead to further degradation of the hippocampus. We refer to a stress experiment suggesting that is possible through the built environment to influence the release of cortisol during stress. This again suggests that the design of e.g. nursing homes can contribute to a slower development of AD in its early stages

    AB - Due to the aging society, dementia is one of the major challenges to the health care systems all over the world. The growing number of patients, the long process and intensive need for care, especially in the later stages of the disease, make the growth in human as well as socioeconomic costs huge. The development of design strategies for nursing homes and other health care facilities such as day care centers addressing the needs of dementia patients is therefore very important. The vast majority of dementia cases is Alzheimer’s Disease, representing approximately 70% of all cases. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that starts in the hippocampus structure in the brain’s limbic system. The hippocampus has three interconnected functions; it holds the cognitive map we use for way-finding, it creates new memories and it forms part of the feedback mechanism that controls the stress hormone cortisol. In the early stages of the disease, the impairment of way-finding and memory is particularly evident. These symptoms are therefore most often prioritized in design proposals and guidelines for AD patients. However, in this paper we argue that perhaps the most important impairment to address is the weakening of the hippocampus’ function in the stress system, as the lack of control of cortisol levels during stress can lead to further degradation of the hippocampus. We refer to a stress experiment suggesting that is possible through the built environment to influence the release of cortisol during stress. This again suggests that the design of e.g. nursing homes can contribute to a slower development of AD in its early stages

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    KW - The Built Environment

    KW - Alzheimer Disease

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    BT - ARCH 17

    A2 - Mathiasen, Nanet

    A2 - Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    PB - Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag

    CY - Copenhagen

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    Fich LB, Wallergård M, Hansen ÅM, Jönsson P. Stress Hormones mediated by the Built Environment: A possibility to influence the progress of Alzheimer's Disease? I Mathiasen N, Frandsen AK, red., ARCH 17: 3RD International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Helath; Coference Proceedings. Copenhagen: Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag. 2017. s. 150-162