Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment

Xijuan Chen, Udo Pauli, Stefan Rehfus, Kai Bester

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

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Resumé

Sludge reed beds have been used for dewatering (draining and evapotranspiration) and mineralisation of sludge in Europe since 1988. Although reed beds are considered as a low cost and low contamination method in reducing volume, breaking down organic matter and increasing the density of sludge, however weather this enhanced biological treatment is suitable for degradation of xenobiotics, is not fully elucidated. This project has pointed out the benefits of using the biological sludge treatment plant to reduce xenobiotic compounds, and the capacity of plants to affect the treatment process.

Three different plants: bulrush (Typha), reed (Phragmites australis) and reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) were planted into 12 containers with a size of 1m Х 1m X 1m which were builded with 20cm gravel and 50cm sludge to study the plants activity in sludge degradation process, 4 containers were left unplanted in order to distinguish the impact of the root system on the performance of the containers. After twelve months OTNE, Triclosan and DEHP were significant degraded with half-lives of 187-204 days for OTNE, 330-462 days for Triclosan and 315-533 days for DEHP.  HHCB and AHTN have half-lives of 770-990 days and 990-1386 days, respectively. Concentration of HHCB-lactone increased after twelve month due to transformation of HHCB. There is no evident difference between samples from different plant covered containers. However, reed (phragmistis australis) grows better in sludge than the other species. A mass balance calculating showed that < 0.7% of compounds was eluted by the rain water.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2009
StatusUdgivet - 2009
BegivenhedSETAC 2009 - Göteborg, Sverige
Varighed: 31 maj 20094 jun. 2009

Konference

KonferenceSETAC 2009
LandSverige
ByGöteborg
Periode31/05/200904/06/2009

Fingerprint

xenobiotics
sludge
half life
degradation
dewatering
root system
sludge treatment
reed
evapotranspiration
mass balance
gravel
grass
mineralization
weather
organic matter
container
cost

Citer dette

Chen, X., Pauli, U., Rehfus, S., & Bester, K. (2009). Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment . Poster præsenteret på SETAC 2009, Göteborg, Sverige.
Chen, Xijuan ; Pauli, Udo ; Rehfus, Stefan ; Bester, Kai. / Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment . Poster præsenteret på SETAC 2009, Göteborg, Sverige.
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title = "Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment",
abstract = "Sludge reed beds have been used for dewatering (draining and evapotranspiration) and mineralisation of sludge in Europe since 1988. Although reed beds are considered as a low cost and low contamination method in reducing volume, breaking down organic matter and increasing the density of sludge, however weather this enhanced biological treatment is suitable for degradation of xenobiotics, is not fully elucidated. This project has pointed out the benefits of using the biological sludge treatment plant to reduce xenobiotic compounds, and the capacity of plants to affect the treatment process. Three different plants: bulrush (Typha), reed (Phragmites australis) and reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) were planted into 12 containers with a size of 1m Х 1m X 1m which were builded with 20cm gravel and 50cm sludge to study the plants activity in sludge degradation process, 4 containers were left unplanted in order to distinguish the impact of the root system on the performance of the containers. After twelve months OTNE, Triclosan and DEHP were significant degraded with half-lives of 187-204 days for OTNE, 330-462 days for Triclosan and 315-533 days for DEHP.  HHCB and AHTN have half-lives of 770-990 days and 990-1386 days, respectively. Concentration of HHCB-lactone increased after twelve month due to transformation of HHCB. There is no evident difference between samples from different plant covered containers. However, reed (phragmistis australis) grows better in sludge than the other species. A mass balance calculating showed that < 0.7{\%} of compounds was eluted by the rain water.",
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Chen, X, Pauli, U, Rehfus, S & Bester, K 2009, 'Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment ' SETAC 2009, Göteborg, Sverige, 31/05/2009 - 04/06/2009, .

Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment . / Chen, Xijuan; Pauli, Udo; Rehfus, Stefan; Bester, Kai.

2009. Poster præsenteret på SETAC 2009, Göteborg, Sverige.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

TY - CONF

T1 - Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment

AU - Chen, Xijuan

AU - Pauli, Udo

AU - Rehfus, Stefan

AU - Bester, Kai

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Sludge reed beds have been used for dewatering (draining and evapotranspiration) and mineralisation of sludge in Europe since 1988. Although reed beds are considered as a low cost and low contamination method in reducing volume, breaking down organic matter and increasing the density of sludge, however weather this enhanced biological treatment is suitable for degradation of xenobiotics, is not fully elucidated. This project has pointed out the benefits of using the biological sludge treatment plant to reduce xenobiotic compounds, and the capacity of plants to affect the treatment process. Three different plants: bulrush (Typha), reed (Phragmites australis) and reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) were planted into 12 containers with a size of 1m Х 1m X 1m which were builded with 20cm gravel and 50cm sludge to study the plants activity in sludge degradation process, 4 containers were left unplanted in order to distinguish the impact of the root system on the performance of the containers. After twelve months OTNE, Triclosan and DEHP were significant degraded with half-lives of 187-204 days for OTNE, 330-462 days for Triclosan and 315-533 days for DEHP.  HHCB and AHTN have half-lives of 770-990 days and 990-1386 days, respectively. Concentration of HHCB-lactone increased after twelve month due to transformation of HHCB. There is no evident difference between samples from different plant covered containers. However, reed (phragmistis australis) grows better in sludge than the other species. A mass balance calculating showed that < 0.7% of compounds was eluted by the rain water.

AB - Sludge reed beds have been used for dewatering (draining and evapotranspiration) and mineralisation of sludge in Europe since 1988. Although reed beds are considered as a low cost and low contamination method in reducing volume, breaking down organic matter and increasing the density of sludge, however weather this enhanced biological treatment is suitable for degradation of xenobiotics, is not fully elucidated. This project has pointed out the benefits of using the biological sludge treatment plant to reduce xenobiotic compounds, and the capacity of plants to affect the treatment process. Three different plants: bulrush (Typha), reed (Phragmites australis) and reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) were planted into 12 containers with a size of 1m Х 1m X 1m which were builded with 20cm gravel and 50cm sludge to study the plants activity in sludge degradation process, 4 containers were left unplanted in order to distinguish the impact of the root system on the performance of the containers. After twelve months OTNE, Triclosan and DEHP were significant degraded with half-lives of 187-204 days for OTNE, 330-462 days for Triclosan and 315-533 days for DEHP.  HHCB and AHTN have half-lives of 770-990 days and 990-1386 days, respectively. Concentration of HHCB-lactone increased after twelve month due to transformation of HHCB. There is no evident difference between samples from different plant covered containers. However, reed (phragmistis australis) grows better in sludge than the other species. A mass balance calculating showed that < 0.7% of compounds was eluted by the rain water.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Chen X, Pauli U, Rehfus S, Bester K. Fate of xenobiotic compounds and plants activity in reed bed sludge treatment . 2009. Poster præsenteret på SETAC 2009, Göteborg, Sverige.