Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Since the publication of Kress and van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse, the term ‘multimodality’ has become established as an academic field within the discourse analytic and social semiotic communities. Multimodality, meaning communication through two or more semiotic resources (e.g. text, images, sounds and gestures), or the perception via the senses (e.g. sight and hearing) – has gained terrain in musicology, too – particularly regarding studies of music videos, films and television commercials, where the shortcomings of an autonomy aesthetical concept of ‘music alone’ is evident (cf. Cook, 1998, 91). Accordingly, one main issue is to examine how different semiotic resources blend or syncretize to new meanings. The deviations of multimodal forms are numerous, and so are the approaches to methodically categorize the forms. However, there seems to be at least two different logical frameworks for the classification of inter-semiotic layering; i.e. they refer to either the degree of similarity and difference between the interacting resources, or the degree of separability and self-sufficiency of the resources. While the former accentuates a relational aspect, the latter measures the level of overlapping. I this paper I will delve into the two classificational frameworks with a focus on music’s attributional potential, and I will discuss the overall question whether multimodality must be characterized by an aporetic or synthetic relation between interacting semiotic resources.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2008
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2008
Begivenhed15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing - Oslo, Norge
Varighed: 5 aug. 20088 aug. 2008
Konferencens nummer: 15

Konference

Konference15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing
Nummer15
LandNorge
ByOslo
Periode05/08/200808/08/2008

Fingerprint

Multimodal Interaction
Resources
Aporia
Multimodality
Music
Discourse
Academic Field
Gesture
Sound
Separability
Self-sufficiency
Musicology
Layering
Social Semiotics
Autonomy
Logic
Communication
Deviation
Music Videos
Television Commercials

Citer dette

Bonde, A. (2008). Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective. Abstract fra 15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing, Oslo, Norge.
Bonde, Anders. / Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective. Abstract fra 15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing, Oslo, Norge.1 s.
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title = "Synthesis or Aporia?: Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective",
abstract = "Since the publication of Kress and van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse, the term ‘multimodality’ has become established as an academic field within the discourse analytic and social semiotic communities. Multimodality, meaning communication through two or more semiotic resources (e.g. text, images, sounds and gestures), or the perception via the senses (e.g. sight and hearing) – has gained terrain in musicology, too – particularly regarding studies of music videos, films and television commercials, where the shortcomings of an autonomy aesthetical concept of ‘music alone’ is evident (cf. Cook, 1998, 91). Accordingly, one main issue is to examine how different semiotic resources blend or syncretize to new meanings. The deviations of multimodal forms are numerous, and so are the approaches to methodically categorize the forms. However, there seems to be at least two different logical frameworks for the classification of inter-semiotic layering; i.e. they refer to either the degree of similarity and difference between the interacting resources, or the degree of separability and self-sufficiency of the resources. While the former accentuates a relational aspect, the latter measures the level of overlapping. I this paper I will delve into the two classificational frameworks with a focus on music’s attributional potential, and I will discuss the overall question whether multimodality must be characterized by an aporetic or synthetic relation between interacting semiotic resources.",
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Bonde, A 2008, 'Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective', 15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing, Oslo, Norge, 05/08/2008 - 08/08/2008.

Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective. / Bonde, Anders.

2008. Abstract fra 15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing, Oslo, Norge.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Synthesis or Aporia?

T2 - Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective

AU - Bonde, Anders

PY - 2008

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N2 - Since the publication of Kress and van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse, the term ‘multimodality’ has become established as an academic field within the discourse analytic and social semiotic communities. Multimodality, meaning communication through two or more semiotic resources (e.g. text, images, sounds and gestures), or the perception via the senses (e.g. sight and hearing) – has gained terrain in musicology, too – particularly regarding studies of music videos, films and television commercials, where the shortcomings of an autonomy aesthetical concept of ‘music alone’ is evident (cf. Cook, 1998, 91). Accordingly, one main issue is to examine how different semiotic resources blend or syncretize to new meanings. The deviations of multimodal forms are numerous, and so are the approaches to methodically categorize the forms. However, there seems to be at least two different logical frameworks for the classification of inter-semiotic layering; i.e. they refer to either the degree of similarity and difference between the interacting resources, or the degree of separability and self-sufficiency of the resources. While the former accentuates a relational aspect, the latter measures the level of overlapping. I this paper I will delve into the two classificational frameworks with a focus on music’s attributional potential, and I will discuss the overall question whether multimodality must be characterized by an aporetic or synthetic relation between interacting semiotic resources.

AB - Since the publication of Kress and van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse, the term ‘multimodality’ has become established as an academic field within the discourse analytic and social semiotic communities. Multimodality, meaning communication through two or more semiotic resources (e.g. text, images, sounds and gestures), or the perception via the senses (e.g. sight and hearing) – has gained terrain in musicology, too – particularly regarding studies of music videos, films and television commercials, where the shortcomings of an autonomy aesthetical concept of ‘music alone’ is evident (cf. Cook, 1998, 91). Accordingly, one main issue is to examine how different semiotic resources blend or syncretize to new meanings. The deviations of multimodal forms are numerous, and so are the approaches to methodically categorize the forms. However, there seems to be at least two different logical frameworks for the classification of inter-semiotic layering; i.e. they refer to either the degree of similarity and difference between the interacting resources, or the degree of separability and self-sufficiency of the resources. While the former accentuates a relational aspect, the latter measures the level of overlapping. I this paper I will delve into the two classificational frameworks with a focus on music’s attributional potential, and I will discuss the overall question whether multimodality must be characterized by an aporetic or synthetic relation between interacting semiotic resources.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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Bonde A. Synthesis or Aporia? Analyzing Multimodal Interaction from a Musicological Perspective. 2008. Abstract fra 15th Nordic Congress of Musicology: Voicing. Sounding. Visualizing, Oslo, Norge.