The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body: A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical approaches draw on performativity, social aesthetics and visual culture. In the final discussion the humanized animal is related to symmetrical anthropology, brought about by the contradictory position between the humanized animal character and a non-humanized social practice in which humans’ attribute themselves with animal behaviors.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelTiere : Pädagogische-antropologische Reflexionen
RedaktørerJohannes Bilstein, Kristin Westphal
Antal sider18
Udgivelses stedWiesbaden
ForlagSpringer
Publikationsdato2018
Sider211-227
ISBN (Trykt)978-3-658-13787-8
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018
BegivenhedJahrestagung 2014 der Kommission Pädagogische Anthropologie : Tiere - Universität Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Tyskland
Varighed: 6 okt. 20148 okt. 2014

Konference

KonferenceJahrestagung 2014 der Kommission Pädagogische Anthropologie
LokationUniversität Koblenz-Landau
LandTyskland
ByKoblenz
Periode06/10/201408/10/2014

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    Buhl, M. (2018). The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body: A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project . I J. Bilstein, & K. Westphal (red.), Tiere : Pädagogische-antropologische Reflexionen (s. 211-227). Wiesbaden: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-13787-8_14
    Buhl, Mie. / The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body : A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project . Tiere : Pädagogische-antropologische Reflexionen. red. / Johannes Bilstein ; Kristin Westphal. Wiesbaden : Springer, 2018. s. 211-227
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    title = "The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body: A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project",
    abstract = "From Disney cartoons we experience animals being humanized and representing a human character to a degree in which it becomes difficult to see them as animals. This is just one example of how animals are attributed with a human character. The impetus for this contribution, however, is a discussion of another cartoon culture of humanized animals: Japanese Manga. Here the animals are not only represented in a humanized way, but Manga culture goes one step further, engaging in the remediation of the cartoon animal to people depicting animals. Female Japanese dress like cats and act like cats. They are called Catgirls.The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical approaches draw on performativity, social aesthetics and visual culture. In the final discussion the humanized animal is related to symmetrical anthropology, brought about by the contradictory position between the humanized animal character and a non-humanized social practice in which humans’ attribute themselves with animal behaviors.",
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    Buhl, M 2018, The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body: A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project . i J Bilstein & K Westphal (red), Tiere : Pädagogische-antropologische Reflexionen. Springer, Wiesbaden, s. 211-227, Jahrestagung 2014 der Kommission Pädagogische Anthropologie , Koblenz, Tyskland, 06/10/2014. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-13787-8_14

    The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body : A discussion of the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls motivated by a Danish school project . / Buhl, Mie.

    Tiere : Pädagogische-antropologische Reflexionen. red. / Johannes Bilstein; Kristin Westphal. Wiesbaden : Springer, 2018. s. 211-227.

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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