The JohnLock Conspiracy, fandom eschatology, and longing to belong

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Using The JohnLock Conspiracy (TJLC), developed by the fandom of the BBC television series 'Sherlock' (2010), as an exemplar, we analyze how the functionality of Tumblr supported the development of a fandom eschatology. In this instance, eschatology is not religious but secular: fans claimed to know what the final end of the Sherlock series was to be, and they interpreted various signs as indicating that this would happen. The infrastructure and interactive design of Tumblr as a platform creates a foundation permitting fan group radicalization. Because of Tumblr's infrastructure and gratification system, forming a tight-knit group is difficult. By developing and using eschatology as a belief system, fans create boundaries, decide membership and proper behavior, and enable the policing of other fans.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer2
TidsskriftTransformative Works and Cultures
Vol/bind27(2018)
Antal sider14
ISSN1941-2258
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 16 jun. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Conspiracy
Longing
Eschatology
Television Series
Religion
Radicalization
Belief Systems
BBC Television
Functionality
Interactive Design

Emneord

    Citer dette

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    abstract = "Using The JohnLock Conspiracy (TJLC), developed by the fandom of the BBC television series 'Sherlock' (2010), as an exemplar, we analyze how the functionality of Tumblr supported the development of a fandom eschatology. In this instance, eschatology is not religious but secular: fans claimed to know what the final end of the Sherlock series was to be, and they interpreted various signs as indicating that this would happen. The infrastructure and interactive design of Tumblr as a platform creates a foundation permitting fan group radicalization. Because of Tumblr's infrastructure and gratification system, forming a tight-knit group is difficult. By developing and using eschatology as a belief system, fans create boundaries, decide membership and proper behavior, and enable the policing of other fans.",
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    The JohnLock Conspiracy, fandom eschatology, and longing to belong. / Christensen, Bo Allesøe; Jensen, Thessa.

    I: Transformative Works and Cultures, Bind 27(2018), 2, 16.06.2018.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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