The nature of nausea: prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment

Signe Harder, Jørn Herrstedt, Jesper Isaksen, Mette Asbjoern Neergaard, Karin Frandsen, Jarl Sigaard, Lise Mondrup, Bodil Abild Jespersen, Mogens Groenvold

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of nausea/vomiting in patients with advanced cancer has a wide range. Due to a very low level of evidence regarding antiemetic treatment, current guidelines recommend an etiology-based approach. The evidence for this approach is also slim and research is urgently needed.

OBJECTIVES: (Part One) to elucidate the prevalence of nausea and the possible associations with sociodemographic and clinical variables and (Part Two) to investigate possible etiologies of nausea and antiemetic treatments initiated in patients with nausea.

METHODS: Patients with advanced cancer and no recent antineoplastic treatment were included in a prospective two-part study. In Part One, patients completed an extended version of the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL. Nauseated patients could then be included in Part Two in which possible etiologies and antiemetic treatment were recorded and a follow-up questionnaire was completed.

RESULTS: Eight hundred twenty-one patients were included and 46% reported any degree of nausea. Younger age and female sex were associated with a higher degree of nausea. Common etiologies included constipation, opioid use, and "other," and treatments associated with a statistically significant decrease in nausea/vomiting were olanzapine, laxatives, corticosteroids, domperidone, and metoclopramide.

CONCLUSION: Nausea was a common symptom in this patient population and many different etiologies were suggested. Most patients reported a lower degree of nausea at follow-up. More research in treatment approaches and specific antiemetics is strongly needed.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSupportive Care in Cancer
Vol/bind27
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)3071-3080
Antal sider10
ISSN0941-4355
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2019
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingerprint

Antineoplastic Agents
Nausea
Antiemetics
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
olanzapine
Vomiting
Domperidone
Laxatives
Metoclopramide
Constipation
Research
Opioid Analgesics
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Guidelines
Population

Citer dette

Harder, Signe ; Herrstedt, Jørn ; Isaksen, Jesper ; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern ; Frandsen, Karin ; Sigaard, Jarl ; Mondrup, Lise ; Jespersen, Bodil Abild ; Groenvold, Mogens. / The nature of nausea : prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment. I: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2019 ; Bind 27, Nr. 8. s. 3071-3080.
@article{41bd8fb7d30a4babb7ffb67580c52462,
title = "The nature of nausea: prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The prevalence of nausea/vomiting in patients with advanced cancer has a wide range. Due to a very low level of evidence regarding antiemetic treatment, current guidelines recommend an etiology-based approach. The evidence for this approach is also slim and research is urgently needed.OBJECTIVES: (Part One) to elucidate the prevalence of nausea and the possible associations with sociodemographic and clinical variables and (Part Two) to investigate possible etiologies of nausea and antiemetic treatments initiated in patients with nausea.METHODS: Patients with advanced cancer and no recent antineoplastic treatment were included in a prospective two-part study. In Part One, patients completed an extended version of the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL. Nauseated patients could then be included in Part Two in which possible etiologies and antiemetic treatment were recorded and a follow-up questionnaire was completed.RESULTS: Eight hundred twenty-one patients were included and 46{\%} reported any degree of nausea. Younger age and female sex were associated with a higher degree of nausea. Common etiologies included constipation, opioid use, and {"}other,{"} and treatments associated with a statistically significant decrease in nausea/vomiting were olanzapine, laxatives, corticosteroids, domperidone, and metoclopramide.CONCLUSION: Nausea was a common symptom in this patient population and many different etiologies were suggested. Most patients reported a lower degree of nausea at follow-up. More research in treatment approaches and specific antiemetics is strongly needed.",
keywords = "Advanced cancer, Etiology, N/V, Nausea, Treatment",
author = "Signe Harder and J{\o}rn Herrstedt and Jesper Isaksen and Neergaard, {Mette Asbjoern} and Karin Frandsen and Jarl Sigaard and Lise Mondrup and Jespersen, {Bodil Abild} and Mogens Groenvold",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-018-4623-1",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "3071--3080",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Physica-Verlag",
number = "8",

}

Harder, S, Herrstedt, J, Isaksen, J, Neergaard, MA, Frandsen, K, Sigaard, J, Mondrup, L, Jespersen, BA & Groenvold, M 2019, 'The nature of nausea: prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment', Supportive Care in Cancer, bind 27, nr. 8, s. 3071-3080. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-018-4623-1

The nature of nausea : prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment. / Harder, Signe; Herrstedt, Jørn; Isaksen, Jesper; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Frandsen, Karin; Sigaard, Jarl; Mondrup, Lise; Jespersen, Bodil Abild; Groenvold, Mogens.

I: Supportive Care in Cancer, Bind 27, Nr. 8, 08.2019, s. 3071-3080.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The nature of nausea

T2 - prevalence, etiology, and treatment in patients with advanced cancer not receiving antineoplastic treatment

AU - Harder, Signe

AU - Herrstedt, Jørn

AU - Isaksen, Jesper

AU - Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

AU - Frandsen, Karin

AU - Sigaard, Jarl

AU - Mondrup, Lise

AU - Jespersen, Bodil Abild

AU - Groenvold, Mogens

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of nausea/vomiting in patients with advanced cancer has a wide range. Due to a very low level of evidence regarding antiemetic treatment, current guidelines recommend an etiology-based approach. The evidence for this approach is also slim and research is urgently needed.OBJECTIVES: (Part One) to elucidate the prevalence of nausea and the possible associations with sociodemographic and clinical variables and (Part Two) to investigate possible etiologies of nausea and antiemetic treatments initiated in patients with nausea.METHODS: Patients with advanced cancer and no recent antineoplastic treatment were included in a prospective two-part study. In Part One, patients completed an extended version of the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL. Nauseated patients could then be included in Part Two in which possible etiologies and antiemetic treatment were recorded and a follow-up questionnaire was completed.RESULTS: Eight hundred twenty-one patients were included and 46% reported any degree of nausea. Younger age and female sex were associated with a higher degree of nausea. Common etiologies included constipation, opioid use, and "other," and treatments associated with a statistically significant decrease in nausea/vomiting were olanzapine, laxatives, corticosteroids, domperidone, and metoclopramide.CONCLUSION: Nausea was a common symptom in this patient population and many different etiologies were suggested. Most patients reported a lower degree of nausea at follow-up. More research in treatment approaches and specific antiemetics is strongly needed.

AB - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of nausea/vomiting in patients with advanced cancer has a wide range. Due to a very low level of evidence regarding antiemetic treatment, current guidelines recommend an etiology-based approach. The evidence for this approach is also slim and research is urgently needed.OBJECTIVES: (Part One) to elucidate the prevalence of nausea and the possible associations with sociodemographic and clinical variables and (Part Two) to investigate possible etiologies of nausea and antiemetic treatments initiated in patients with nausea.METHODS: Patients with advanced cancer and no recent antineoplastic treatment were included in a prospective two-part study. In Part One, patients completed an extended version of the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL. Nauseated patients could then be included in Part Two in which possible etiologies and antiemetic treatment were recorded and a follow-up questionnaire was completed.RESULTS: Eight hundred twenty-one patients were included and 46% reported any degree of nausea. Younger age and female sex were associated with a higher degree of nausea. Common etiologies included constipation, opioid use, and "other," and treatments associated with a statistically significant decrease in nausea/vomiting were olanzapine, laxatives, corticosteroids, domperidone, and metoclopramide.CONCLUSION: Nausea was a common symptom in this patient population and many different etiologies were suggested. Most patients reported a lower degree of nausea at follow-up. More research in treatment approaches and specific antiemetics is strongly needed.

KW - Advanced cancer

KW - Etiology

KW - N/V

KW - Nausea

KW - Treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059570620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-018-4623-1

DO - 10.1007/s00520-018-4623-1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 3071

EP - 3080

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 8

ER -