The Role of Women in Strengthening Communities Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism in Kenya: A Theoritical Perspective

Michael Omondi Owiso, Faith Mbulwa

Publikation: Working paperForskning

Resumé

This paper examines the roles women play in strengthening communities against radicalisation and violent extremism. Radicalisation and violent extremism are precursor to terrorism and focusing on them amounts to preventing terrorism at an earlier stage, before it is too late for non coercive measures. The realisation that traditional methods of combating terrorism are expensive and destruct development gravely affecting women, who in the first place it seeks to protect, has led to handling its root causes which is radicalism and violent extremism with non coercive measure. Further, the number of women joining and involved in extremist organisations is on the rise. There are a number of factors and processes that lead women through radicalisation with distinct patterns. The factors include: feelings of real or perceived marginalization; hopelessness; identity crisis; exclusion from national resources; frustrated expectations; relative deprivation and idleness as a result of widespread unemployment. Understanding these pathways is fundamental in efforts to adequately challenge the threat of violent extremism. These pathways in Kenya include the presence of local extremists, foreign radical preachers who import the Salafi ideology into the country and radical groups such as Alshabaab taking advantages of perceived historical and current injustices such as the Operation Usalama Watch which scapegoated ethnic Somalis in Kenya. By addressing both the factors and the process through women get radicalised and become violent extremist who can engage in terror, is a measure to both in targeting front-end prevention of radicalisation as well as developing infrastructures for de-radicalisation. This study was guided by three theories that is; Frustration Aggression Hypothesis and Relative Deprivation that attempt to explain the causes of radicalisation and violent extremism and Human Development Theory that attempts to guide on how radicalisation and violent extremism could be handled in order to achieve lasting peace and security in communities. Secondary data from archives, journal, internet and books was cross analysed providing a trend analysis of the changes posed by women in their role in radicalisation and violent extremism as well as strengthening against radicalisation and violent extremism.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
StatusUnder udarbejdelse - 2019

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radicalization
radicalism
Kenya
community
terrorism
deprivation
identity crisis
cause
women's role
development theory
frustration
aggression
import
unemployment
peace
exclusion
ideology
threat
infrastructure
Internet

Citer dette

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The Role of Women in Strengthening Communities Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism in Kenya: A Theoritical Perspective. / Owiso, Michael Omondi; Mbulwa, Faith .

2019.

Publikation: Working paperForskning

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