Zones of proximal emotional development - Psychotherapy within a neuroaffective perspective

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

2 Citationer (Scopus)

Resumé

This article outlines a conceptual framework for assessing personal and emotional functions of a person’s zone of proximal emotional development. The framework is based on the integrative theory Neuroaffective Developmental Psychology (NADP), which brings together attachment theory, neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and trauma theory. Within the NADP framework, this article describes a way of understanding children’s normal emotional mental organization and of examining how this mental organization may be developed or disturbed by relational issues. It also describes how a child’s mental organization can be disturbed and thus, without intervention, disturb the child’s personality development on a lifelong basis. The article presents three case vignettes, describing three children growing into adolescence with three different attachment patterns and suggested individually tailored intervention plans for each of them, relevant and useful for clinicians working with vulnerable children and families. Because the nervous system retains its plasticity throughout life, attachment is not necessarily an unchangeable pattern. That is why we as clinicians should develop psychotherapeutic methods and a research-based way of determining “what works for whom” by assessing the zone of individual proximal emotional development. The text outlines the characteristics of NADP and how it can be used to structure an intervention plan.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
Vol/bind17
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)28-42
Antal sider15
ISSN1528-9168
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2 jan. 2018

Fingerprint

Psychotherapy
Organizations
Personality Development
Neuropsychology
Child Development
Nervous System
Developmental Psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Research

Citer dette

@article{7f9dc3c3305f4a59890ae334e2a031a0,
title = "Zones of proximal emotional development - Psychotherapy within a neuroaffective perspective",
abstract = "This article outlines a conceptual framework for assessing personal and emotional functions of a person’s zone of proximal emotional development. The framework is based on the integrative theory Neuroaffective Developmental Psychology (NADP), which brings together attachment theory, neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and trauma theory. Within the NADP framework, this article describes a way of understanding children’s normal emotional mental organization and of examining how this mental organization may be developed or disturbed by relational issues. It also describes how a child’s mental organization can be disturbed and thus, without intervention, disturb the child’s personality development on a lifelong basis. The article presents three case vignettes, describing three children growing into adolescence with three different attachment patterns and suggested individually tailored intervention plans for each of them, relevant and useful for clinicians working with vulnerable children and families. Because the nervous system retains its plasticity throughout life, attachment is not necessarily an unchangeable pattern. That is why we as clinicians should develop psychotherapeutic methods and a research-based way of determining “what works for whom” by assessing the zone of individual proximal emotional development. The text outlines the characteristics of NADP and how it can be used to structure an intervention plan.",
author = "Susan Hart and Jacobsen, {Stine Lindahl}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/15289168.2018.1425588",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "28--42",
journal = "Journal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy",
issn = "1528-9168",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

Zones of proximal emotional development - Psychotherapy within a neuroaffective perspective. / Hart, Susan; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl.

I: Journal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy, Bind 17, Nr. 1, 02.01.2018, s. 28-42.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Zones of proximal emotional development - Psychotherapy within a neuroaffective perspective

AU - Hart, Susan

AU - Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

PY - 2018/1/2

Y1 - 2018/1/2

N2 - This article outlines a conceptual framework for assessing personal and emotional functions of a person’s zone of proximal emotional development. The framework is based on the integrative theory Neuroaffective Developmental Psychology (NADP), which brings together attachment theory, neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and trauma theory. Within the NADP framework, this article describes a way of understanding children’s normal emotional mental organization and of examining how this mental organization may be developed or disturbed by relational issues. It also describes how a child’s mental organization can be disturbed and thus, without intervention, disturb the child’s personality development on a lifelong basis. The article presents three case vignettes, describing three children growing into adolescence with three different attachment patterns and suggested individually tailored intervention plans for each of them, relevant and useful for clinicians working with vulnerable children and families. Because the nervous system retains its plasticity throughout life, attachment is not necessarily an unchangeable pattern. That is why we as clinicians should develop psychotherapeutic methods and a research-based way of determining “what works for whom” by assessing the zone of individual proximal emotional development. The text outlines the characteristics of NADP and how it can be used to structure an intervention plan.

AB - This article outlines a conceptual framework for assessing personal and emotional functions of a person’s zone of proximal emotional development. The framework is based on the integrative theory Neuroaffective Developmental Psychology (NADP), which brings together attachment theory, neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and trauma theory. Within the NADP framework, this article describes a way of understanding children’s normal emotional mental organization and of examining how this mental organization may be developed or disturbed by relational issues. It also describes how a child’s mental organization can be disturbed and thus, without intervention, disturb the child’s personality development on a lifelong basis. The article presents three case vignettes, describing three children growing into adolescence with three different attachment patterns and suggested individually tailored intervention plans for each of them, relevant and useful for clinicians working with vulnerable children and families. Because the nervous system retains its plasticity throughout life, attachment is not necessarily an unchangeable pattern. That is why we as clinicians should develop psychotherapeutic methods and a research-based way of determining “what works for whom” by assessing the zone of individual proximal emotional development. The text outlines the characteristics of NADP and how it can be used to structure an intervention plan.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044142107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15289168.2018.1425588

DO - 10.1080/15289168.2018.1425588

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 28

EP - 42

JO - Journal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

JF - Journal of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

SN - 1528-9168

IS - 1

ER -