Academic staff as “transition managers” in interdisciplinary, international MA education: A Danish case study

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Abstract

The article builds on an empirical study of knowledge practices in international, interdisciplinary MA education, foregrounding the role of academic staff in identifying and explicating academic norms to students recruited from different subject areas and institutions. A central theme is transition, which refers to the state of liminality that postgraduates can experience when new to a discipline, institution and socio-cultural context. The author argues for lecturers as ‘transition managers’, who may ease students’ transfer into an unfamiliar academic culture. This argument is explored in an analysis of interview data collected from four MA courses, which suggests that lecturers’ transition management involves an awareness of classroom diversity, an acceptance of responsibility for academic socialisation and the development of new pedagogic practices.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLearning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences
Volume12
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)44-67
Number of pages24
ISSN1755-2273
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

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university teacher
manager
Students
staff
Education
Socialization
Socialisation
pedagogics
education
student
acceptance
Interviews
classroom
responsibility
interview
management
experience

Cite this

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abstract = "The article builds on an empirical study of knowledge practices in international, interdisciplinary MA education, foregrounding the role of academic staff in identifying and explicating academic norms to students recruited from different subject areas and institutions. A central theme is transition, which refers to the state of liminality that postgraduates can experience when new to a discipline, institution and socio-cultural context. The author argues for lecturers as ‘transition managers’, who may ease students’ transfer into an unfamiliar academic culture. This argument is explored in an analysis of interview data collected from four MA courses, which suggests that lecturers’ transition management involves an awareness of classroom diversity, an acceptance of responsibility for academic socialisation and the development of new pedagogic practices.",
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