Aging and eye tracking: in the quest for objective biomarkers

Ramtin Z Marandi, Parisa Gazerani

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Recent applications of eye tracking for diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of therapy in age-related neurological or psychological deficits have been reviewed. The review is focused on active aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. The potential impacts and current limitations of using characterizing features of eye movements and pupillary responses (oculometrics) as objective biomarkers in the context of aging are discussed. A closer look into the findings, especially with respect to cognitive impairments, suggests that eye tracking is an invaluable technique to study hidden aspects of aging that have not been revealed using any other noninvasive tool. Future research should involve a wider variety of oculometrics, in addition to saccadic metrics and pupillary responses, including nonlinear and combinatorial features as well as blink- and fixation-related metrics to develop biomarkers to trace age-related irregularities associated with cognitive and neural deficits.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberFNL33
JournalFuture Neurology
Volume14
Issue number4
ISSN1479-6708
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • active aging
  • age-related deficits
  • aging
  • biomarkers
  • eye tracking
  • neurodegeneration
  • neurological
  • oculometrics
  • psychological
  • pupillary responses

Cite this

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title = "Aging and eye tracking: in the quest for objective biomarkers",
abstract = "Recent applications of eye tracking for diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of therapy in age-related neurological or psychological deficits have been reviewed. The review is focused on active aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. The potential impacts and current limitations of using characterizing features of eye movements and pupillary responses (oculometrics) as objective biomarkers in the context of aging are discussed. A closer look into the findings, especially with respect to cognitive impairments, suggests that eye tracking is an invaluable technique to study hidden aspects of aging that have not been revealed using any other noninvasive tool. Future research should involve a wider variety of oculometrics, in addition to saccadic metrics and pupillary responses, including nonlinear and combinatorial features as well as blink- and fixation-related metrics to develop biomarkers to trace age-related irregularities associated with cognitive and neural deficits.",
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Aging and eye tracking : in the quest for objective biomarkers. / Marandi, Ramtin Z; Gazerani, Parisa.

In: Future Neurology, Vol. 14, No. 4, FNL33, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Marandi, Ramtin Z

AU - Gazerani, Parisa

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AB - Recent applications of eye tracking for diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of therapy in age-related neurological or psychological deficits have been reviewed. The review is focused on active aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. The potential impacts and current limitations of using characterizing features of eye movements and pupillary responses (oculometrics) as objective biomarkers in the context of aging are discussed. A closer look into the findings, especially with respect to cognitive impairments, suggests that eye tracking is an invaluable technique to study hidden aspects of aging that have not been revealed using any other noninvasive tool. Future research should involve a wider variety of oculometrics, in addition to saccadic metrics and pupillary responses, including nonlinear and combinatorial features as well as blink- and fixation-related metrics to develop biomarkers to trace age-related irregularities associated with cognitive and neural deficits.

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KW - age-related deficits

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KW - biomarkers

KW - eye tracking

KW - neurodegeneration

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KW - oculometrics

KW - psychological

KW - pupillary responses

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