Alpha-linolenic acid may lower the rate of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies investigating the association between intake of the plant-derived n-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have shown conflicting results. However, the effect of ALA intake on ASCVD may depend on the intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.We aimed to explore the association between ALA intake and risk of ASCVD in subjects consuming below and above the 10th percentile of marine n-3 fatty acids, respectively.We followed men and women enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n=57.053) by linkage with nationwide registers and identified all incident ASCVD cases. All participants were aged 50 to 65 years at baseline. ASCVD was defined as the first registration of myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease or ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusions. Intake of ALA and marine n-3 fatty acids was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and expressed as energy-adjusted intake. Statistical analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression.During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, we identified a total of 3958 incident ASCVD cases including 366 cases among subjects in the lowest 10th percentile of consumption of marine n-3 fatty acids (\lt;252 mg/day). In multivariable analyses, we found a statistically significant inverse association between ALA modelled as a restricted cubic spline and the rate of ASCVD (p=0.005) in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids, whereas no statistically significant association was found between ALA intake and ASCVD in subjects with a higher intake of marine n-3 fatty acids (p=0.155) (Figure).Intake of ALA may be associated with a lower rate of ASCVD in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.The Danish Heart Foundation (17-R115-A7415-22060), Helene and Georg Jensens and Ethel Merethe and Christian Pontoppidan's Fund.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberehz745.0299
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume40
Issue numberSuppl. 1
Pages (from-to)2045
Number of pages1
ISSN0195-668X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019
EventEuropean Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019 - Paris, France
Duration: 31 Aug 20194 Oct 2019
https://www.escardio.org/Congresses-&-Events/ESC-Congress

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period31/08/201904/10/2019
Internet address

Cite this

@article{c6f8fcb3fcef465cad32c3c509fb4fb6,
title = "Alpha-linolenic acid may lower the rate of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids",
abstract = "Previous studies investigating the association between intake of the plant-derived n-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have shown conflicting results. However, the effect of ALA intake on ASCVD may depend on the intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.We aimed to explore the association between ALA intake and risk of ASCVD in subjects consuming below and above the 10th percentile of marine n-3 fatty acids, respectively.We followed men and women enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n=57.053) by linkage with nationwide registers and identified all incident ASCVD cases. All participants were aged 50 to 65 years at baseline. ASCVD was defined as the first registration of myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease or ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusions. Intake of ALA and marine n-3 fatty acids was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and expressed as energy-adjusted intake. Statistical analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression.During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, we identified a total of 3958 incident ASCVD cases including 366 cases among subjects in the lowest 10th percentile of consumption of marine n-3 fatty acids (\lt;252 mg/day). In multivariable analyses, we found a statistically significant inverse association between ALA modelled as a restricted cubic spline and the rate of ASCVD (p=0.005) in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids, whereas no statistically significant association was found between ALA intake and ASCVD in subjects with a higher intake of marine n-3 fatty acids (p=0.155) (Figure).Intake of ALA may be associated with a lower rate of ASCVD in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.The Danish Heart Foundation (17-R115-A7415-22060), Helene and Georg Jensens and Ethel Merethe and Christian Pontoppidan's Fund.",
author = "Bork, {C S} and Venoe, {S K} and Lasota, {A N} and S Lundbye-Christensen and A Tjoenneland and K Overvad and Schmidt, {E B}",
note = "Abstract no. P3425",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1093/eurheartj/ehz745.0299",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "2045",
journal = "European Heart Journal",
issn = "0195-668X",
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Alpha-linolenic acid may lower the rate of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids. / Bork, C S; Venoe, S K; Lasota, A N; Lundbye-Christensen, S; Tjoenneland, A; Overvad, K; Schmidt, E B.

In: European Heart Journal, Vol. 40, No. Suppl. 1, ehz745.0299, 10.2019, p. 2045.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Alpha-linolenic acid may lower the rate of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids

AU - Bork, C S

AU - Venoe, S K

AU - Lasota, A N

AU - Lundbye-Christensen, S

AU - Tjoenneland, A

AU - Overvad, K

AU - Schmidt, E B

N1 - Abstract no. P3425

PY - 2019/10

Y1 - 2019/10

N2 - Previous studies investigating the association between intake of the plant-derived n-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have shown conflicting results. However, the effect of ALA intake on ASCVD may depend on the intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.We aimed to explore the association between ALA intake and risk of ASCVD in subjects consuming below and above the 10th percentile of marine n-3 fatty acids, respectively.We followed men and women enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n=57.053) by linkage with nationwide registers and identified all incident ASCVD cases. All participants were aged 50 to 65 years at baseline. ASCVD was defined as the first registration of myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease or ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusions. Intake of ALA and marine n-3 fatty acids was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and expressed as energy-adjusted intake. Statistical analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression.During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, we identified a total of 3958 incident ASCVD cases including 366 cases among subjects in the lowest 10th percentile of consumption of marine n-3 fatty acids (\lt;252 mg/day). In multivariable analyses, we found a statistically significant inverse association between ALA modelled as a restricted cubic spline and the rate of ASCVD (p=0.005) in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids, whereas no statistically significant association was found between ALA intake and ASCVD in subjects with a higher intake of marine n-3 fatty acids (p=0.155) (Figure).Intake of ALA may be associated with a lower rate of ASCVD in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.The Danish Heart Foundation (17-R115-A7415-22060), Helene and Georg Jensens and Ethel Merethe and Christian Pontoppidan's Fund.

AB - Previous studies investigating the association between intake of the plant-derived n-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have shown conflicting results. However, the effect of ALA intake on ASCVD may depend on the intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.We aimed to explore the association between ALA intake and risk of ASCVD in subjects consuming below and above the 10th percentile of marine n-3 fatty acids, respectively.We followed men and women enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n=57.053) by linkage with nationwide registers and identified all incident ASCVD cases. All participants were aged 50 to 65 years at baseline. ASCVD was defined as the first registration of myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease or ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusions. Intake of ALA and marine n-3 fatty acids was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and expressed as energy-adjusted intake. Statistical analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression.During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, we identified a total of 3958 incident ASCVD cases including 366 cases among subjects in the lowest 10th percentile of consumption of marine n-3 fatty acids (\lt;252 mg/day). In multivariable analyses, we found a statistically significant inverse association between ALA modelled as a restricted cubic spline and the rate of ASCVD (p=0.005) in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids, whereas no statistically significant association was found between ALA intake and ASCVD in subjects with a higher intake of marine n-3 fatty acids (p=0.155) (Figure).Intake of ALA may be associated with a lower rate of ASCVD in subjects with a low intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.The Danish Heart Foundation (17-R115-A7415-22060), Helene and Georg Jensens and Ethel Merethe and Christian Pontoppidan's Fund.

U2 - 10.1093/eurheartj/ehz745.0299

DO - 10.1093/eurheartj/ehz745.0299

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 40

SP - 2045

JO - European Heart Journal

JF - European Heart Journal

SN - 0195-668X

IS - Suppl. 1

M1 - ehz745.0299

ER -