An Empirical Study of Propagation Models for Wireless Communications in Open-pit Mines

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Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the suitability of the
propagation models ITU-R 526, Okumura Hata, COST Hata
models and Standard Propagation Model (SPM) to predict
the path loss in open-pit mines. The models are evaluated by
comparing the predicted data with measurements obtained in two
operational iron-ore mining complexes in Brazil. Additionally, a
simple deterministic model, based on the inclusion of an effective
antenna height term to the ITU-R 526, is proposed and compared
to the other methods. The results show that the proposed model
results in root-mean-square error values between 5.5 dB and 9.2
dB, and it is capable of providing a close approximation of the
best predictions (i.e. those with lowest root-mean-squared error)
as provided by the SPM. The proposed model, however, reduces
the calibration complexity considerably
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2018 IEEE 87th Vehicular Technology Conference, VTC Spring 2018 - Proceedings
Number of pages6
PublisherIEEE
Publication date6 Jun 2018
Pages1-6
ISBN (Print)978-1-5386-6356-1
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5386-6355-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2018
EventIEEE Vehicular Technology Conference Spring 2018 - Porto, Portugal
Duration: 3 Jun 20186 Jun 2018
http://www.ieeevtc.org/vtc2018spring/

Conference

ConferenceIEEE Vehicular Technology Conference Spring 2018
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityPorto
Period03/06/201806/06/2018
Internet address
SeriesIEEE Vehicular Technology Conference. Proceedings
ISSN1550-2252

Keywords

  • readio propagation
  • uhf
  • industrial communications
  • mines
  • Industrial communications in mines
  • UHF measurements
  • Radio Propagation

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