An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A mature HCI body of pioneering research and development is presented. Proof-of-concept and feasibility research from the 1980s led to the realizing of bespoke unencumbered gesture-based computer feedback systems for supplementing traditional therapeutic intervention for rehabilitation intervention, as well as healthcare, wellness, and quality of life. A wide array of participants, across ages, ability and condition, were involved in numerous studies. Resulting from the research is patented apparatus and method, commercial product, start-up companies, and major funding in the form of national and international projects. Positive evaluations of use were by experts in the healthcare field, as well as case-assigned staff, client families and friends. Independent third party therapist study outcomes report marked improvement up to 400% in training specific performance compared to traditional intervention. This chapter informs via biographical discussion of the evolution from original concept based upon empowering human residual function, whatever the limitation(s), to manipulate selectable multimedia content as catalyst in adaptive systems design. Emergent models to support industry uptake evolved from the research that was the foundation of pioneering an e-health solution at the end of the 20th century to support self-driven brain injury rehabilitation between a patient's home and a connected clinic. The work pre-empts the uptake by professional therapists of video games and gesture-based controllers reported at the start of the 21st century. Based in Scandinavia, due to the national and regional welfare technology programmes of support and concern for an accessible society, the work continues to evolve with new systems being created with an ongoing goal to advance the field. This contribution thus offers a historical account having a HCI focus in order to share and inspire next-generation therapists, designers and technologists who are welcome to contact the author regards project collaboration.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction
EditorsKent L. Norman, Jurek Kirakowski
Number of pages22
Volume2
PublisherWiley
Publication date1 Jan 2018
Pages923-944
Chapter43
ISBN (Print)9781118976135
ISBN (Electronic)9781118976005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Rehabilitation
Delivery of Health Care
Gestures
Research
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Video Games
Multimedia
Aptitude
Computer Systems
Brain Injuries
Industry
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Technology
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • (Re)habilitation Training
  • Adaptive Residual Function Systems
  • Afferent-Efferent Neural Feedback Loop Closure
  • All abilities
  • All ages
  • ArtAbilitation
  • Authoring tool
  • Balance training
  • Fun
  • GameAbilitation
  • Gamification
  • Gaming
  • Inclusive creative expression
  • Play
  • Reafferentation
  • Robotic Device Control
  • Sensors (worn, held and free-standing)
  • Serious Games

Cite this

Brooks, A. L. (2018). An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation. In K. L. Norman, & J. Kirakowski (Eds.), The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction (Vol. 2, pp. 923-944). Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118976005.ch43
Brooks, Anthony Lewis. / An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation. The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction. editor / Kent L. Norman ; Jurek Kirakowski. Vol. 2 Wiley, 2018. pp. 923-944
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Brooks, AL 2018, An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation. in KL Norman & J Kirakowski (eds), The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction. vol. 2, Wiley, pp. 923-944. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118976005.ch43

An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation. / Brooks, Anthony Lewis.

The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction. ed. / Kent L. Norman; Jurek Kirakowski. Vol. 2 Wiley, 2018. p. 923-944.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Brooks AL. An HCI Approach in Contemporary Healthcare and (Re)habilitation. In Norman KL, Kirakowski J, editors, The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction. Vol. 2. Wiley. 2018. p. 923-944 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118976005.ch43