Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

49 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

As both the number and share of elderly people is increasing in western countries, the number of persons with dementia (PWD) is also increasing. ‘Dementia’ covers more than 200 diseases of the brain, and symptoms include memory loss, difficulties with wayfinding and problem solving and changes in behavior.
Dementia is a progressive condition. In the beginning, the symptoms are small and yet can affect daily life. At this stage, most PWD still live independently or with support from relatives in their own homes. As the symptoms get worse, more professional care is required as well as a physical environment adapted to their needs. Several research studies highlight important aspects regarding the design of the physical environment in care homes for PWD. However, due to increasing demand, there are not enough care homes, and more importantly, most people strongly wish to remain living in their own homes.
This raises the question: Is it possible to adapt design solutions for care homes for PWD to ordinary housing and in this way postpone the need for a nursing home?
This paper discusses options that enable PWD to stay longer in their original homes and familiar surroundings by incorporating recommendations regarding the design of care homes for PWD to upgrade ordinary housing into lifetime homes that are also suitable for elderly with dementia.
This paper is based on previous research, partly conducted at SBi, on the design of care homes for PWD. The findings of the research will be applied to a specific case; a Danish residential area for the elderly.
The discussion is based on a UD perspective (Lid, 2013) and focuses on whether the needs of the few (PWD) will be beneficial for the many.
Results indicate that by respecting the needs of PWD in designing housing, this type of housing may be turned into lifetime homes. A broad group of people, including PWD, will benefit from this design strategy as it improves architectural quality, wayfinding, social interaction and the quality of life of all residents.
Translated title of the contributionAt designe boliger for personer i det tidlige stadie af demens
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSafe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society
EditorsAdolfo F.L. Baratta, Milena Farina, Fabrizio Finucci, Giovanni Formica, Alfonso Giancotti, Luca Montuori, Valerio Palmieri
Number of pages8
Place of PublicationTriviso
PublisherAnteferma Edizioni Srl
Publication date26 Oct 2018
Pages195-202
ChapterOld and new housing models
ISBN (Electronic)978-88-32050-02-8
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2018
EventSafe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society - Architecture Department of Roma Tre University, Rom, Italy
Duration: 26 Oct 201826 Oct 2018

Conference

ConferenceSafe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society
LocationArchitecture Department of Roma Tre University
CountryItaly
CityRom
Period26/10/201826/10/2018

Fingerprint

dementia
human being
home care
housing
type of housing
residential area
nursing home
quality of life
brain
resident
Disease

Keywords

  • dementia
  • lifetime homes
  • Universal Design
  • wayfinding
  • outdoor area

Cite this

Sigbrand, L., & Kirkeby, I. M. (2018). Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia. In A. F. L. Baratta, M. Farina, F. Finucci, G. Formica, A. Giancotti, L. Montuori, & V. Palmieri (Eds.), Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society (pp. 195-202). Triviso: Anteferma Edizioni Srl.
Sigbrand, Lone ; Kirkeby, Inge Mette. / Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia. Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society. editor / Adolfo F.L. Baratta ; Milena Farina ; Fabrizio Finucci ; Giovanni Formica ; Alfonso Giancotti ; Luca Montuori ; Valerio Palmieri. Triviso : Anteferma Edizioni Srl, 2018. pp. 195-202
@inproceedings{0899e84c4677470881ab1fe3baf05785,
title = "Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia",
abstract = "As both the number and share of elderly people is increasing in western countries, the number of persons with dementia (PWD) is also increasing. ‘Dementia’ covers more than 200 diseases of the brain, and symptoms include memory loss, difficulties with wayfinding and problem solving and changes in behavior. Dementia is a progressive condition. In the beginning, the symptoms are small and yet can affect daily life. At this stage, most PWD still live independently or with support from relatives in their own homes. As the symptoms get worse, more professional care is required as well as a physical environment adapted to their needs. Several research studies highlight important aspects regarding the design of the physical environment in care homes for PWD. However, due to increasing demand, there are not enough care homes, and more importantly, most people strongly wish to remain living in their own homes.This raises the question: Is it possible to adapt design solutions for care homes for PWD to ordinary housing and in this way postpone the need for a nursing home? This paper discusses options that enable PWD to stay longer in their original homes and familiar surroundings by incorporating recommendations regarding the design of care homes for PWD to upgrade ordinary housing into lifetime homes that are also suitable for elderly with dementia. This paper is based on previous research, partly conducted at SBi, on the design of care homes for PWD. The findings of the research will be applied to a specific case; a Danish residential area for the elderly. The discussion is based on a UD perspective (Lid, 2013) and focuses on whether the needs of the few (PWD) will be beneficial for the many. Results indicate that by respecting the needs of PWD in designing housing, this type of housing may be turned into lifetime homes. A broad group of people, including PWD, will benefit from this design strategy as it improves architectural quality, wayfinding, social interaction and the quality of life of all residents.",
keywords = "demens, Boligbyggeri, wayfinding, uderum, Universelt design, dementia, lifetime homes, Universal Design, wayfinding, outdoor area",
author = "Lone Sigbrand and Kirkeby, {Inge Mette}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "26",
language = "English",
pages = "195--202",
editor = "Baratta, {Adolfo F.L.} and Milena Farina and Fabrizio Finucci and Giovanni Formica and Alfonso Giancotti and Luca Montuori and Valerio Palmieri",
booktitle = "Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society",
publisher = "Anteferma Edizioni Srl",

}

Sigbrand, L & Kirkeby, IM 2018, Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia. in AFL Baratta, M Farina, F Finucci, G Formica, A Giancotti, L Montuori & V Palmieri (eds), Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society. Anteferma Edizioni Srl, Triviso, pp. 195-202, Rom, Italy, 26/10/2018.

Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia. / Sigbrand, Lone; Kirkeby, Inge Mette.

Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society. ed. / Adolfo F.L. Baratta; Milena Farina; Fabrizio Finucci; Giovanni Formica; Alfonso Giancotti; Luca Montuori; Valerio Palmieri. Triviso : Anteferma Edizioni Srl, 2018. p. 195-202.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia

AU - Sigbrand, Lone

AU - Kirkeby, Inge Mette

PY - 2018/10/26

Y1 - 2018/10/26

N2 - As both the number and share of elderly people is increasing in western countries, the number of persons with dementia (PWD) is also increasing. ‘Dementia’ covers more than 200 diseases of the brain, and symptoms include memory loss, difficulties with wayfinding and problem solving and changes in behavior. Dementia is a progressive condition. In the beginning, the symptoms are small and yet can affect daily life. At this stage, most PWD still live independently or with support from relatives in their own homes. As the symptoms get worse, more professional care is required as well as a physical environment adapted to their needs. Several research studies highlight important aspects regarding the design of the physical environment in care homes for PWD. However, due to increasing demand, there are not enough care homes, and more importantly, most people strongly wish to remain living in their own homes.This raises the question: Is it possible to adapt design solutions for care homes for PWD to ordinary housing and in this way postpone the need for a nursing home? This paper discusses options that enable PWD to stay longer in their original homes and familiar surroundings by incorporating recommendations regarding the design of care homes for PWD to upgrade ordinary housing into lifetime homes that are also suitable for elderly with dementia. This paper is based on previous research, partly conducted at SBi, on the design of care homes for PWD. The findings of the research will be applied to a specific case; a Danish residential area for the elderly. The discussion is based on a UD perspective (Lid, 2013) and focuses on whether the needs of the few (PWD) will be beneficial for the many. Results indicate that by respecting the needs of PWD in designing housing, this type of housing may be turned into lifetime homes. A broad group of people, including PWD, will benefit from this design strategy as it improves architectural quality, wayfinding, social interaction and the quality of life of all residents.

AB - As both the number and share of elderly people is increasing in western countries, the number of persons with dementia (PWD) is also increasing. ‘Dementia’ covers more than 200 diseases of the brain, and symptoms include memory loss, difficulties with wayfinding and problem solving and changes in behavior. Dementia is a progressive condition. In the beginning, the symptoms are small and yet can affect daily life. At this stage, most PWD still live independently or with support from relatives in their own homes. As the symptoms get worse, more professional care is required as well as a physical environment adapted to their needs. Several research studies highlight important aspects regarding the design of the physical environment in care homes for PWD. However, due to increasing demand, there are not enough care homes, and more importantly, most people strongly wish to remain living in their own homes.This raises the question: Is it possible to adapt design solutions for care homes for PWD to ordinary housing and in this way postpone the need for a nursing home? This paper discusses options that enable PWD to stay longer in their original homes and familiar surroundings by incorporating recommendations regarding the design of care homes for PWD to upgrade ordinary housing into lifetime homes that are also suitable for elderly with dementia. This paper is based on previous research, partly conducted at SBi, on the design of care homes for PWD. The findings of the research will be applied to a specific case; a Danish residential area for the elderly. The discussion is based on a UD perspective (Lid, 2013) and focuses on whether the needs of the few (PWD) will be beneficial for the many. Results indicate that by respecting the needs of PWD in designing housing, this type of housing may be turned into lifetime homes. A broad group of people, including PWD, will benefit from this design strategy as it improves architectural quality, wayfinding, social interaction and the quality of life of all residents.

KW - demens

KW - Boligbyggeri

KW - wayfinding

KW - uderum

KW - Universelt design

KW - dementia

KW - lifetime homes

KW - Universal Design

KW - wayfinding

KW - outdoor area

M3 - Article in proceeding

SP - 195

EP - 202

BT - Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society

A2 - Baratta, Adolfo F.L.

A2 - Farina, Milena

A2 - Finucci, Fabrizio

A2 - Formica, Giovanni

A2 - Giancotti, Alfonso

A2 - Montuori, Luca

A2 - Palmieri, Valerio

PB - Anteferma Edizioni Srl

CY - Triviso

ER -

Sigbrand L, Kirkeby IM. Designing lifetime homes for people in the early stages of dementia. In Baratta AFL, Farina M, Finucci F, Formica G, Giancotti A, Montuori L, Palmieri V, editors, Safe and Inclusive Housing for an Ageing Society. Triviso: Anteferma Edizioni Srl. 2018. p. 195-202